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DRM_777
12-12-2012, 02:51 AM
So, I stumbled across this video yesterday and it's completely blown my mind.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hW_iiNo2ECE

The tech being used is purely mechanical, it's not a robot guitar, and there are no electronic retuning going on and I have to say, the results are outstanding.

If you are intrigued at all then go have a look at the site http://www.evertune.com/ and have a more detailed look.

The three main 6 string bridges they make for Strat, Tele and Les Paul type guitars are $330 (£205) and their 7 String version for Strat shape guitars is $480 (£298) which I think given how good it seems, is actually quite reasonable. Of course there is just the question of getting it fitted.

I would assume that one of the above types of bridges would retrofit in place of the main types used on PRS guitars, and if so, is this something you would consider?

I'm actually seriously considering looking into picking up another SE Cu24 or a 245 and getting an EverTune fitted.....

Thoughts?

Harw00d
12-12-2012, 07:17 AM
To fit these bridges you have to remove a massive amount of wood from the guitar. Even more than a guitar that already has a trem!
If you go on the site there are links to 'fitting' videos.

DRM_777
12-12-2012, 10:23 AM
To fit these bridges you have to remove a massive amount of wood from the guitar. Even more than a guitar that already has a trem!
If you go on the site there are links to 'fitting' videos.

Yeah I've had a look at all that and and I reckon it's a viable trade off since the way the bridges appear to be designed and manufactured to maintain great tone, if not a better tone than a factory fitted bridge.....

rugerpc
12-12-2012, 10:31 AM
Probably not better tone, but a bit different. That huge mass of metal is just going to resonate differently than the wood that used to be in its place.

Remember that the nuances of guitar tone as relates to the construction and materials of the guitar are subtractive, not additive.

themike
12-12-2012, 10:32 AM
Its cool and I respect anyone who is trying to create truly innovative products but at the same time, thats a lot of wood to remove from a guitar on an aftermarket basis. I also don't find it asthetically pleasing nor do I dislike my current bridges enough to warrant the switch. I think more people would benefit from learning how to properly set up a guitar haha.

newfmp3
12-12-2012, 11:24 AM
I can't deny that it is freaking cool though. What a concept. I applaud anyone trying to inovate the guitar into something better. Sometimes I feel we have enough strats/tele/LP's in the world and something new wouldn't hurt.

sergiodeblanc
12-12-2012, 01:24 PM
AutotuneTEK.

swede71
12-12-2012, 09:21 PM
Very interesting bridge.

DRM_777
12-13-2012, 05:41 AM
I think far too much emphasis is being placed on the amount of wood being removed etc because like I said before, the bridge is designed to compensate for these changes.


Does the spring suspension system affect tone and sustain?

Every change to any bridge affects tone and sustain. We have gone to great lengths to use good tonal materials such as steel to get a tone that we think is great. Strings attached to springs resonate only 75%-80% as long and usually have a softer attack because some of the resonant energy bleeds into the springs. To compensate, we developed spring buffers and dampers, a great saddle design, and lots of steel.

As a result, EverTune’s attack and sustain are as good and better than other floating bridges, and the tone is louder and brighter than a stock bridge on many of the prototype guitars we have installed. Many people are concerned that EverTune’s functionality will be at the expense of tone. To this we can offer that the huge majority of our beta testers say that their guitars sound MUCH BETTER after the EverTune installation. This may be because guitars that are beautifully in tune all the way up the neck, re-enforce the sounds and frequencies of chords and melodies. It may be because of our high quality steel saddles. We feel that the tone of this first ever EverTune is awesome, and we are constantly working to make it better.

I personally think it's one of the most interesting and genuine advances in guitar tech in recent years and I love the fact that it's purely mechanical and isn't using a computer to do the work, and I own a Line 6 Variax acoustic and I'm about ready to get a Tyler Variax soon too.

It has a fundamental purpose - to keep your guitar perfectly in tune - and it works!

Not sure if I have the technical skill to be able to install one myself, but I am definitely going to look into getting one fitted to a PRS SE in the not too distant future.

rugerpc
12-13-2012, 07:45 AM
I think far too much emphasis is being placed on the amount of wood being removed etc because like I said before, the bridge is designed to compensate for these changes.



Does the spring suspension system affect tone and sustain?

Every change to any bridge affects tone and sustain. We have gone to great lengths to use good tonal materials such as steel to get a tone that we think is great. Strings attached to springs resonate only 75%-80% as long and usually have a softer attack because some of the resonant energy bleeds into the springs. To compensate, we developed spring buffers and dampers, a great saddle design, and lots of steel.

As a result, EverTune’s attack and sustain are as good and better than other floating bridges, and the tone is louder and brighter than a stock bridge on many of the prototype guitars we have installed. Many people are concerned that EverTune’s functionality will be at the expense of tone. To this we can offer that the huge majority of our beta testers say that their guitars sound MUCH BETTER after the EverTune installation. This may be because guitars that are beautifully in tune all the way up the neck, re-enforce the sounds and frequencies of chords and melodies. It may be because of our high quality steel saddles. We feel that the tone of this first ever EverTune is awesome, and we are constantly working to make it better.



I personally think it's one of the most interesting and genuine advances in guitar tech in recent years and I love the fact that it's purely mechanical and isn't using a computer to do the work, and I own a Line 6 Variax acoustic and I'm about ready to get a Tyler Variax soon too.

It has a fundamental purpose - to keep your guitar perfectly in tune - and it works!

Not sure if I have the technical skill to be able to install one myself, but I am definitely going to look into getting one fitted to a PRS SE in the not too distant future.

Like I said above - different tone. Not the tone from the body woods, but tone from the steel and aluminum. It will sound different. Whether that is an enhancement or not is in the ears of the designer ("...to get a tone that we think is great."), and the owner.

I'm not poo-pooing the system - it is interesting. I'm just saying that anyone who puts one of these on a guitar is going to get a different guitar in return. If the difference is something you are looking for, then it works for you.

DRM_777
12-13-2012, 09:45 AM
Like I said above - different tone. Not the tone from the body woods, but tone from the steel and aluminum. It will sound different. Whether that is an enhancement or not is in the ears of the designer ("...to get a tone that we think is great."), and the owner.

I'm not poo-pooing the system - it is interesting. I'm just saying that anyone who puts one of these on a guitar is going to get a different guitar in return.

Without a doubt anyone who wants their tone to stay exactly the same is obviously not going to be interested in this system at all.

But I think the key word in regards to the change in tone is not "different" but "better", (assuming what the designers say is to be believed). If their blurb is to be believed then yes, it will change the tone, but this change is apparently a significant improvement and through the demonstrations I have watched, I've never questioned the quality of the tone being put out by the guitars with these bridges fitted.

I think it's safe to say that for all intents an purposes, with one of these bridges, a strat is gonna sound like a strat, a tele is gonna sound like a tele and an Les Paul is still gonna sound like a Les Paul.

On that theory, if I do end up fitting one to a PRS Custom 24 SE, I'm 99.9% sure it's still fundamentally going to sound like a Custom 24 SE. But better. (Apparently).

rugerpc
12-13-2012, 10:03 AM
Without a doubt anyone who wants their tone to stay exactly the same is obviously not going to be interested in this system at all.

But I think the key word in regards to the change in tone is not "different" but "better", (assuming what the designers say is to be believed). If their blurb is to be believed then yes, it will change the tone, but this change is apparently a significant improvement and through the demonstrations I have watched, I've never questioned the quality of the tone being put out by the guitars with these bridges fitted.

I think it's safe to say that for all intents an purposes, with one of these bridges, a strat is gonna sound like a strat, a tele is gonna sound like a tele and an Les Paul is still gonna sound like a Les Paul.

On that theory, if I do end up fitting one to a PRS Custom 24 SE, I'm 99.9% sure it's still fundamentally going to sound like a Custom 24 SE. But better. (Apparently).

I'm not picking a fight, I just disagree with the tone getting "better." If you like a guitar enough to own and play it, maybe it already has a tone that is right for you. So doing anything to it that changes that tone from different strings, to a different nut or a pound of steel and aluminum is going to need to be evaluated by the owner, not the manufacturer. Each individual needs to be OK with the changes and decide if they are a significant improvement or not

Metal resonance/damping is different from wood resonance/damping. For the extreme example, think metal topped resonator acoustics. One is not universally 'better' than the other, but they are 'different.'

You want one. Cool. Go for it! It is just not the case that it is universally 'better.'

Take, for example, the assertion that the guitar is 'louder.' Really? This is needed when there are so many good amps out there which will damage our ears at even 1/4 volume?

Take the assertion of first decreased, and then though compensation, increased sustain. Nice for notes held longer - irrelevant or even detrimental to rapid or staccato playing.

One person's silk purse is another's sow's ear.

Choices are good, but changing the tone of a guitar is only 'better' if it is the change you are seeking.

jfb
12-13-2012, 10:17 AM
When I first seen Ola's video of this bridge, with True Temperament, on the guitar from VSG I was impressed. When he starts down tuning...and then bends a string...MIND BLOWN. Haha.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RzoxGBstjsk

Here's one where Fred snips strings and it's still in tune. Cool stuff.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3mhA8VMnSPY

DRM_777
12-13-2012, 10:56 AM
I'm not picking a fight, I just disagree with the tone getting "better." If you like a guitar enough to own and play it, maybe it already has a tone that is right for you. So doing anything to it that changes that tone from different strings, to a different nut or a pound of steel and aluminum is going to need to be evaluated by the owner, not the manufacturer. Each individual needs to be OK with the changes and decide if they are a significant improvement or not

Metal resonance/damping is different from wood resonance/damping. For the extreme example, think metal topped resonator acoustics. One is not universally 'better' than the other, but they are 'different.'

You want one. Cool. Go for it! It is just not the case that it is universally 'better.'

Take, for example, the assertion that the guitar is 'louder.' Really? This is needed when there are so many good amps out there which will damage our ears at even 1/4 volume?

Take the assertion of first decreased, and then though compensation, increased sustain. Nice for notes held longer - irrelevant or even detrimental to rapid or staccato playing.

One person's silk purse is another's sow's ear.

Choices are good, but changing the tone of a guitar is only 'better' if it is the change you are seeking.

Who is picking a fight? I'm simply rebutting the point's you're making in the tradition of a mature discussion/debate.

Continuing this theme, I for one, I have not said that this bridge is categorically going to make any guitar it's fitted to, sound better. I've put in all the caveats based on what the designers are saying about it.

However, my point that a Stat with an Ever Tune bridge is still going to fundamentally sound like a Strat etc, remains unchanged.

I'm not actually looking for a specific change in tone and I don't believe that this is the catalyst for anyone to want/need an Ever Tune bridge fitted because the main benefit from these bridges is rock solid tuning across the neck, but IF my SE Cu 24 benefits tone wise from having an Ever Tune fitted, I don't see how that can be a bad thing.....right?

rugerpc
12-13-2012, 11:12 AM
It's all cool - I just didn't want you to think that I was trying to pick a fight...

You didn't say it, but the company did.

We have gone to great lengths to use good tonal materials such as steel to get a tone that we think is great.

Tone is such a subjective thing. I just believe that when a company says that their product will improve tone or make it better or the best, we need to take that with a saltshaker full of salt.


...the tone is louder and brighter than a stock bridge on many of the prototype guitars we have installed.

What if you are searching for quieter and darker? (Nevermind that tone cannot get 'louder.')

We're all searching for different things, we all play differently. With that in mind, generalizations about perceived improvements (or detriments) should probably be avoided.

Companies also need to be careful in their promotional materials that they don't conflate musical properties.


...our beta testers say that their guitars sound MUCH BETTER after the EverTune installation. This may be because guitars that are beautifully in tune all the way up the neck, re-enforce the sounds and frequencies of chords and melodies.

Tone and intonation are not the same thing and are not interchangeable.

swede71
12-13-2012, 03:21 PM
I checked in sweden to have it installeded in a Fender American Standard strat.Very expensive so be prepared to pay alot of dollars.Try it out first and see what the differences in sound is.I would love to see that bridge in a PRS guitar.Go for it DRM 777! :)

solacematt
12-13-2012, 09:54 PM
Shimon Moore of Sick Puppies has been using these on his Gibson and Epiphone Hollowbodies fora few years now,he's done a few Evertune videos discussing them as well. Seems like a cool idea, but like of you, no way would I chop my up my guitar like that