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garrett
02-01-2013, 03:59 PM
Hey, read any good books lately?

I always read while riding the train to and from work. I actually feel weird without a book in my hand. I'm feeling a bit uninspired for ideas lately, though. I've mainly been reading Stephen King stuff for the last several months, but I'm over his style for now.

Anybody read the Jack Reacher books? My interest is piqued after all the press about the film. It's a mighty long series, would keep me occupied a while!

I like a pretty wide range of stuff, from King to the Dexter novels, historical non-fiction, biography, music, classics.

So... whatcha readin'?

Goldtop
02-01-2013, 07:45 PM
I'm reading the Keith Richards autobiography "Life" right now. It's one of the best books I've ever read regardless of genre, and maybe the best music-related book. I wasn't a big fan of him or The Stones, so I put off reading this one for a long time. Big mistake on my part.

Goldtop Lloyd

tacomadriver
02-01-2013, 08:00 PM
I like to read detective murder mysteries. Elly Griffiths, Dana Stabenow, Spencer Quinn, Henning Mankell, Alexander McCall Smith come to mind as series novels. If I like the characters I want to read more. I recently finished The Complaints by Ian Rankin and have another to read in the works. For non fiction I found Brian Greene can make trying to understand the universe easier. I got a Kindle when they first came on the scene but have since moved o the iPad.

tacomadriver
02-01-2013, 08:03 PM
I'm reading the Keith Richards autobiography "Life" right now. It's one of the best books I've ever read regardless of genre, and maybe the best music-related book. I wasn't a big fan of him or The Stones, so I put off reading this one for a long time. Big mistake on my part.

Goldtop Lloyd

Thank you for that. I have it in my pile but haven't been able to start it yet.

11top
02-01-2013, 08:33 PM
The latest Stephen King novel about time travel and attempting to stop the Kennedy assassination is fantastic. Also, any Robert Crais, Harlin Cobin, or Nelson DeMille is a worthy read. What sets these guys apart? Smart a$$, but believable dialogue.

alantig
02-02-2013, 12:21 AM
I read a ton, although once my kids were born, my reading time declined (I read over 100 books in a year at least once). Magazines as well as books, although I've fallen way behind with some mags.

As for books, among the more recent were Penn Jillette's latest, "Every Day Is An Atheist Holiday!" Some great stories in there - the love in his family really comes through in his stories. His stories about his parents are especially touching. In his previous book, he told a story about him and his friends discussing whether they could have turned in a sibling as happened with the Unabomber and his brother. Penn's sister was there and said, "Why is this even a discussion? How could you have anything to discuss?" Someone asked her if she would turn Penn in if he'd done something like that. She said no, and they threw other questions at her but she never wavered. Penn said it was inconceivable to her to do something like that to her brother. He also told a story about telling his mother he loved her. She said, "Of course you do", meaning not that she was diminishing the sentiment, but that she couldn't imagine that he wouldn't love her the way she loved him. Oh, and the story in the new book about James Randi's Houdini bust is classic.

Let's see, beyond that, I just read a Randy Rhoads book that was put out by Velocity. It's a big honking book with tons of pictures and a lot of stories from folks from the Quiet Riot era as well as the Ozzy years, and Randy's girlfriend. It was kind of overpriced, to be honest, but I'm a big Rhoads fan, so it was worth it to me.

Pete Townshend's book, "Who I Am" is also a good read, although there are some times when you wish he'd be a bit more forthcoming.

Peter Criss's "From Makeup To Breakup" was really interesting. He got into some of the stories that Ace Frehley didn't in his book. He does come across as a bit petulant at times, but he calls himself on quite a few things.

The Stephen King book that Steve mentioned ("11/22/63") is really good - a different way to approach the story of the Kennedy assassination. Trivia - IIRC, King also wrote a script for the Twilight Zone reboot in the 80s that centered on the Kennedy assassination. I've read WAY too many books about that - I actually gave up reading about it for a number of years because I burned out on it.

Another King book, "Billy Blockade" - a collection of two short stories. The title story is a cool baseball story with a King twist.

"Abbey Road To Ziggy Stardust" - Ken Scott's career from the Beatles to Bowie to Elton to Missing Persons and beyond. Great behind the scenes stuff, especially about how the studios worked.

"Year Zero" by Rob Reid - an alien culture discovers Earth's music, and after years realizes how much they owe in royalties and determines the only honorable thing to do is destroy Earth because they can't pay.

Next up, "Making Rumours", about the Fleetwood Mac album. Then I can try to catch up on Vince Flynn, Christopher Moore (great stuff there), King and a whole lot more.

Mikegarveyblues
02-02-2013, 12:37 AM
Just finished My Bass And Other Animals by session bassist Guy Pratt. Good read!

Downloaded The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, The Girl Who Played With Fire & The Girl Who Kicked The Hornets Nest (Millenium Series) by Stieg Larsson. Enjoyed the original and 'Hollywood' versions of the 'Dragon Tattoo' so I thought i'd give the books a whirl.

Got a dozen or so James Patterson books to be read too, but I never get round to it.

Daniel
02-02-2013, 01:34 AM
http://www.jackpotthebook.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/JackpotPaperbackCover2.jpg

vchizzle
02-02-2013, 02:04 AM
The Slash book is really good. I'm a bit biased cause I'm pretty into his stuff. I don't read many books all the way through. This one was well done and kept my interest.

justmund
02-02-2013, 03:49 AM
I read a few of the Jack Reacher books when I visited my Aunty in New Zealand, only because I ran out of her Matthew Reilly books. Those things are like full on action movies, they never let up!

Goldtop
02-02-2013, 06:06 AM
Thank you for that. I have it in my pile but haven't been able to start it yet.

You're welcome. I hope you enjoy it. Let us know?

Goldtop Lloyd

Goldtop
02-02-2013, 06:16 AM
As for books, among the more recent were Penn Jillette's latest, "Every Day Is An Atheist Holiday!" Some great stories in there - the love in his family really comes through in his stories. His stories about his parents are especially touching. In his previous book, he told a story about him and his friends discussing whether they could have turned in a sibling as happened with the Unabomber and his brother. Penn's sister was there and said, "Why is this even a discussion? How could you have anything to discuss?" Someone asked her if she would turn Penn in if he'd done something like that. She said no, and they threw other questions at her but she never wavered. Penn said it was inconceivable to her to do something like that to her brother. He also told a story about telling his mother he loved her. She said, "Of course you do", meaning not that she was diminishing the sentiment, but that she couldn't imagine that he wouldn't love her the way she loved him. Oh, and the story in the new book about James Randi's Houdini bust is classic.

Let's see, beyond that, I just read a Randy Rhoads book that was put out by Velocity. It's a big honking book with tons of pictures and a lot of stories from folks from the Quiet Riot era as well as the Ozzy years, and Randy's girlfriend. It was kind of overpriced, to be honest, but I'm a big Rhoads fan, so it was worth it to me.

Pete Townshend's book, "Who I Am" is also a good read, although there are some times when you wish he'd be a bit more forthcoming.

Peter Criss's "From Makeup To Breakup" was really interesting. He got into some of the stories that Ace Frehley didn't in his book. He does come across as a bit petulant at times, but he calls himself on quite a few things.

Next up, "Making Rumours", about the Fleetwood Mac album. Then I can try to catch up on Vince Flynn, Christopher Moore (great stuff there), King and a whole lot more.

You and I have some similar interests. I think Pete's book is next for me. I liked the Peter Criss, but I thought Ace's was awful. A disappointment because I'm a fan of his music and playing.

I'm a BIG fan of The Who, so I'm always looking for books on them. Some are hard to find nowadays, unfortunately. Same for Fleetwood.

Lloyd

tiboy
02-02-2013, 06:18 AM
Hey, read any good books lately?

I always read while riding the train to and from work. I actually feel weird without a book in my hand. I'm feeling a bit uninspired for ideas lately, though. I've mainly been reading Stephen King stuff for the last several months, but I'm over his style for now.

Anybody read the Jack Reacher books? My interest is piqued after all the press about the film. It's a mighty long series, would keep me occupied a while!

I like a pretty wide range of stuff, from King to the Dexter novels, historical non-fiction, biography, music, classics.

So... whatcha readin'?

I've read all the Jack Reacher books. Easy fun reading. In the books Jack is 6'5" tall whereas Cruise is closer to 5'6" tall.. Try the Vincent Flynn Mitch Rab (sp?) series. Mitch is a CIA assassin who kills bad guys to protect his country.

Mikegarveyblues
02-02-2013, 08:41 AM
Not read any Jack Racher books yet, i'll have to give one a try.

I want Osama by Chris Ryan and possibly a couple of Andy McNab ones for my action fix!

docbennett
02-02-2013, 08:50 AM
Philip Jose Farmer
Harlan Ellison
Kurt Vonnegut
Steven King (Until he wrote "Bag of Bones"...can't really get through anything he's done since the late '80's or so.
Philip K. Dick (all time favorite author, and in my opinion, a metaphysical genius who actually personally experienced a crack in the space-time continuum and spent the rest of his 9 years of life trying to understand it (2-3-74).


One day, I hope to be able to finally read and understand WTF James Joyce was trying to convey in "Finnegans Wake".

garrett
02-02-2013, 09:45 AM
Glad to see we have a lot of readers around here.

I also enjoyed the Keith Richards auto-bio. I'm not particularly a fan of his or the Stones, but it was a fascinating read for the most part.

I have read one Harlan Coben book, from the Myron Bolitar series. My wife does book swaps with friends a lot, so she's read a bunch of his stuff and passed it on before I got the chance to read others. It was an entertaining, easy read.

The Millennium Series books were great. Obviously the book was better than the Dragon Tattoo movie (I've seen both versions as well). The extra insight in the book really helps the story. I could see how people would have trouble following the Hollywood movie version. I think the second and third books will translate to the silver screen better.

I'm sure I'll get back into Stephen King at some point. Over the last year or two, I've read the Dark Tower Series, 'Salems Lot, The Stand, The Dark Half and Misery. I'm just a bit burnt out on his stuff.

docbennett
02-02-2013, 10:10 AM
IMO, since the late '80's.....if you've read one Steve King...you've read them all. I think he's run out of basic ideas, and keeps churning out the same concepts and dialogue ad nauseum.

I really enjoyed "Lobotomy" which was Dee Dee Ramones' Autobiography, written a year or two before he OD'ed right after his H.O.F. induction ceremony. Beware the "accidental hot shot".

I also enjoyed his ex-wife Vera's take on the story, "Poison Heart" written a few years after he accidentally offed himself. What's nice is that Vera seems to have a better relationship with his spirit now, through mediums, than she ever had when he was alive. :flute:

Apparently Death cures both Bi-polar disorder AND drug dependency and Abuse. Something to look forward to, I guess.:vroam:

garrett
02-02-2013, 01:40 PM
I took my little girl to the library today and grabbed a couple of Vonnegut novels while I was there: Cat's Cradle and Slaughterhouse-Five. They both looked intriguing. Should make for some good reading when i go on vacation at the end of the week.

I agree on the Stephen King comment. I think he has a tendency to over describe things. I didn't notice it in the Dark Tower books.

sergiodeblanc
02-02-2013, 01:50 PM
I took my little girl to the library today and grabbed a couple of Vonnegut novels while I was there: Cat's Cradle and Slaughterhouse-Five. They both looked intriguing. Should make for some good reading when i go on vacation at the end of the week.


I love Vonnegut! I moved into a place with a fellow who had the most amazing library back when I was in my twenties, I think I read every one of Vonnegut's novels that year! Check out "Sirens of Titan" and "Mother Night" if you enjoy his style.


I can't let a discussion about books go by without recommending Christopher Moore and Douglas Coupland. "Lamb" by Moore and Jpod by Coupland are two of the most enjoyable books I have ever read.

docbennett
02-02-2013, 02:34 PM
I took my little girl to the library today and grabbed a couple of Vonnegut novels while I was there: Cat's Cradle and Slaughterhouse-Five. They both looked intriguing. Should make for some good reading when i go on vacation at the end of the week.

I agree on the Stephen King comment. I think he has a tendency to over describe things. I didn't notice it in the Dark Tower books.




I love Vonnegut! I moved into a place with a fellow who had the most amazing library back when I was in my twenties, I think I read every one of Vonnegut's novels that year! Check out "Sirens of Titan" and "Mother Night" if you enjoy his style.


I can't let a discussion about books go by without recommending Christopher Moore and Douglas Coupland. "Lamb" by Moore and Jpod by Coupland are two of the most enjoyable books I have ever read.


My Ebay handle is "rarebooksnguitars". I had every book Vonnegut ever wrote, from "Player Piano" to "A Man Without A Country" signed! And I had all of his various signature incarnations, from his earliest on Player Piano to the more stylized circa "Slaughterhouse-5" and later. As well as his signature with his famous caricature that showed his face in profile.

My biggest mistake was selling the entire collection as a group about 2 weeks after he died a few years ago. That's the price of GAS. One Decent Private Stock = about 20 signed 1st editions. And it's very weird how your perspective changes, relative to your hobby. A signed, 1st edition "Slaughterhouse-5" for $1,500? Outrageous!!! Same price for a PRS? A freakin' steal.

BTW, and FWIW...."Slaughterhouse 5" comes as close to THE GREAT AMERICAN NOVEL as I've considered anything written by anybody. You can't appreciate the 3-Dimensional world and Time, until you understand it from a Tralfamadorian perspective.

mithogo
02-02-2013, 10:10 PM
"Guitar Zero." This book is very entertaining and informative. The author Gary Marcus is a cognitive psychologist. He started learning guitar when he was 39. He is an expert in the psychology of learning.
It describes his journey. He uses some well explained clinical terminology and a great sense of humor to describe the process. This book is actually motivating me to continue to learn. I highly recommend it. It's a Must Read if you are a parent.

HIGHLIGHTS, QUOTES FROM THE BOOK AND FROM REVIEWS:
Learning exercises the brain and practice spurs brain growth. Learning makes us happy.

Two prerequisites to achieve skill and expertise: "Tons of practice" and "Quality, focused, deliberate practice."

"Learning the rudiments of piano came relatively easy, the guitar was brutal."

"Memory, perception,coordination, strength: guitar is just plain hard."

alantig
02-03-2013, 12:04 AM
Touching on a few points raised since my last post...

Vonnegut is one of those guys who, when I read one of his books, my immediate reaction is why don't I read more of his stuff?

Christopher Moore's "Lamb" is an absolute gem. There was a later edition released in a faux-black leather cover (think bible cover) with an afterword that talks about the reaction he got to the book. Very interesting,

Lloyd - the Ace book was rather disappointing. I was looking for more insight into how Kiss worked, both in the studio and as a group, but it wasn't there. And what was there was really disjointed. There were some stories that just felt like they needed to go somewhere to make them worthwhile.

As for King, there was a stretch late in the Dark Tower series where he inserted a character named Stephen King that almost totally paralleled his real life (it includes the van accident as part of the story and such). It struck me as rather overindulgent and I thought it might have been less distracting to make it another character.

alantig
02-03-2013, 12:07 AM
NSFW...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BwkdGr9JYmE

docbennett
02-03-2013, 08:29 AM
As for King, there was a stretch late in the Dark Tower series where he inserted a character named Stephen King that almost totally paralleled his real life (it includes the van accident as part of the story and such). It struck me as rather overindulgent and I thought it might have been less distracting to make it another character.

King was able to turn his accident into a great story with "Misery"...but, for some reason....much of his later work appears to be a rehash of earlier themes done again again and again.

I could NEVER even touch the dark tower series...even when it first appeared as a serial in the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction...my bible from the late'60's until the mid to late '80's when it deteriorated after Ed Ferman left as editor.

And then....there was Harlan Ellison who politely accused King of "unintentional plagiarism" with regard to several of his works...claiming that "Steve wouldn't do that on purpose...it must have been unconscious and not on purpose"....giving a friend a pass during a politically incorrect period of his work. IMO...it wasn't plagiarism...at least, not to the extent that James Cameron ripped off Ellison's two "Outer Limits" scripts to create "The Terminator" ("Soldier" and "Demon with a Glass Hand"...pure rip offs for Ahhhnald's movie and paid dearly later on)...it was purely because Steve had run out of ideas and was just churning out old plot lines and ideas in "new" formats. Oh well...don't get me going on Steve King...I hate it when a formerly great writer ("The Stand" is one of my favorite stories ever) becomes mediocre. That said....I'll still recommend one of the more recent (but still, kinda remote based on his prodigious productivity) "Insomnia" which did have me captivated for about 400+ pages.

BTW...anyone else think that King is great for the first 400 pages or so...and then, just runs out of steam and the books simmers to a conclusion as opposed to reaching a real climax??

For those unfamiliar with Ellison...read the short story "I have no Mouth and I must Scream"....it will take less than an hour and convert you immediately.

For those unfamiliar with Philip Jose Farmer (RIP and my internet friend) start with "To your Scattered Bodies Go" and then revel in the story of how all of humanity that ever lived is resurrected along the banks of the great river....and the quest to find the reason for why this has happened. Once you get that under your belt...you're ready for "Maker of Universes" which begins the "World of Tiers" series.

finally....for those unfamiliar with Philip K Dick...whose work, since his death has become the movies "Bladerunner", "Paycheck", "Imposter", "Total Recall", "A Scanner Darkly", "Screamers", "Minority Report" and "Next" to name several....begin with "The Man in the High Castle" and you'll get your first taste of his concept of alternative realities and the prevailing theme of "What is real, and what is not reality". After all..for two months in 1974 he had an ongoing relationship with his "counterpart" from AD 100 or so....leading to his multi-thousand page work "Exigenesis" which attempted to explain why we are not really here at all....but rather under the reality created by a malevolent deity circa 2000 years ago. Pretty intriguing stuff.


Edit...now that I think if it..."Misery" may have actually preceded his Van accident, and may have actually been a portent of things to come.

sergiodeblanc
02-03-2013, 01:01 PM
Christopher Moore's "Lamb" is an absolute gem. There was a later edition released in a faux-black leather cover (think bible cover) with an afterword that talks about the reaction he got to the book. Very interesting,



Yes! I have that edition, and it's signed! I have seriously bought and loaned out at least four copies of that book, and I get excited whenever it is mentioned. I read some random interview with Duff from G-n-R where he mentioned that he was in the middle of reading it, he was positively gushing about it too.

garrett
02-03-2013, 05:22 PM
King was able to turn his accident into a great story with "Misery"...but, for some reason....much of his later work appears to be a rehash of earlier themes done again again and again.

I could NEVER even touch the dark tower series...even when it first appeared as a serial in the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction...my bible from the late'60's until the mid to late '80's when it deteriorated after Ed Ferman left as editor.

And then....there was Harlan Ellison who politely accused King of "unintentional plagiarism" with regard to several of his works...claiming that "Steve wouldn't do that on purpose...it must have been unconscious and not on purpose"....giving a friend a pass during a politically incorrect period of his work. IMO...it wasn't plagiarism...at least, not to the extent that James Cameron ripped off Ellison's two "Outer Limits" scripts to create "The Terminator" ("Soldier" and "Demon with a Glass Hand"...pure rip offs for Ahhhnald's movie and paid dearly later on)...it was purely because Steve had run out of ideas and was just churning out old plot lines and ideas in "new" formats. Oh well...don't get me going on Steve King...I hate it when a formerly great writer ("The Stand" is one of my favorite stories ever) becomes mediocre. That said....I'll still recommend one of the more recent (but still, kinda remote based on his prodigious productivity) "Insomnia" which did have me captivated for about 400+ pages.

BTW...anyone else think that King is great for the first 400 pages or so...and then, just runs out of steam and the books simmers to a conclusion as opposed to reaching a real climax??

For those unfamiliar with Ellison...read the short story "I have no Mouth and I must Scream"....it will take less than an hour and convert you immediately.

For those unfamiliar with Philip Jose Farmer (RIP and my internet friend) start with "To your Scattered Bodies Go" and then revel in the story of how all of humanity that ever lived is resurrected along the banks of the great river....and the quest to find the reason for why this has happened. Once you get that under your belt...you're ready for "Maker of Universes" which begins the "World of Tiers" series.

finally....for those unfamiliar with Philip K Dick...whose work, since his death has become the movies "Bladerunner", "Paycheck", "Imposter", "Total Recall", "A Scanner Darkly", "Screamers", "Minority Report" and "Next" to name several....begin with "The Man in the High Castle" and you'll get your first taste of his concept of alternative realities and the prevailing theme of "What is real, and what is not reality". After all..for two months in 1974 he had an ongoing relationship with his "counterpart" from AD 100 or so....leading to his multi-thousand page work "Exigenesis" which attempted to explain why we are not really here at all....but rather under the reality created by a malevolent deity circa 2000 years ago. Pretty intriguing stuff.


Edit...now that I think if it..."Misery" may have actually preceded his Van accident, and may have actually been a portent of things to come.

Totally agree that King's books peak early. I don't feel that way about the Dark Tower books, though. They're easily his best books of what I've read so far.

I liked how he wrote himself into the Dark Tower. I get a kick out of blending fantasy with reality. Mind bending stuff is always fun.

alantig
02-03-2013, 06:30 PM
Yes! I have that edition, and it's signed! I have seriously bought and loaned out at least four copies of that book, and I get excited whenever it is mentioned. I read some random interview with Duff from G-n-R where he mentioned that he was in the middle of reading it, he was positively gushing about it too.

I had mine signed "Happy Easter!"

sergiodeblanc
02-03-2013, 09:53 PM
I had mine signed "Happy Easter!"

Brilliant!

I will trade anybody here who buys "Lamb" a different book if you don't absolutely love it.

Texas_minor_blues
02-03-2013, 10:47 PM
Lamb! I haven't read that book in ages...
Anyone else a Dresden Files fan? Great Sci-fi series

garrett
02-04-2013, 08:36 AM
Okay, I'm putting Christopher Moore on my shortlist. My wife may have already read the vampire themed ones. She's a nut for anything vampire-related.

Albrecht Smuten
02-04-2013, 08:46 AM
King was able to turn his accident into a great story with "Misery"...but, for some reason....much of his later work appears to be a rehash of earlier themes done again again and again.

I could NEVER even touch the dark tower series...even when it first appeared as a serial in the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction...my bible from the late'60's until the mid to late '80's when it deteriorated after Ed Ferman left as editor.

And then....there was Harlan Ellison who politely accused King of "unintentional plagiarism" with regard to several of his works...claiming that "Steve wouldn't do that on purpose...it must have been unconscious and not on purpose"....giving a friend a pass during a politically incorrect period of his work. IMO...it wasn't plagiarism...at least, not to the extent that James Cameron ripped off Ellison's two "Outer Limits" scripts to create "The Terminator" ("Soldier" and "Demon with a Glass Hand"...pure rip offs for Ahhhnald's movie and paid dearly later on)...it was purely because Steve had run out of ideas and was just churning out old plot lines and ideas in "new" formats. Oh well...don't get me going on Steve King...I hate it when a formerly great writer ("The Stand" is one of my favorite stories ever) becomes mediocre. That said....I'll still recommend one of the more recent (but still, kinda remote based on his prodigious productivity) "Insomnia" which did have me captivated for about 400+ pages.

BTW...anyone else think that King is great for the first 400 pages or so...and then, just runs out of steam and the books simmers to a conclusion as opposed to reaching a real climax??

For those unfamiliar with Ellison...read the short story "I have no Mouth and I must Scream"....it will take less than an hour and convert you immediately.

For those unfamiliar with Philip Jose Farmer (RIP and my internet friend) start with "To your Scattered Bodies Go" and then revel in the story of how all of humanity that ever lived is resurrected along the banks of the great river....and the quest to find the reason for why this has happened. Once you get that under your belt...you're ready for "Maker of Universes" which begins the "World of Tiers" series.

finally....for those unfamiliar with Philip K Dick...whose work, since his death has become the movies "Bladerunner", "Paycheck", "Imposter", "Total Recall", "A Scanner Darkly", "Screamers", "Minority Report" and "Next" to name several....begin with "The Man in the High Castle" and you'll get your first taste of his concept of alternative realities and the prevailing theme of "What is real, and what is not reality". After all..for two months in 1974 he had an ongoing relationship with his "counterpart" from AD 100 or so....leading to his multi-thousand page work "Exigenesis" which attempted to explain why we are not really here at all....but rather under the reality created by a malevolent deity circa 2000 years ago. Pretty intriguing stuff.


Edit...now that I think if it..."Misery" may have actually preceded his Van accident, and may have actually been a portent of things to come.

"I have no Mouth and I must Scream" is a killer short story. I've read it in english and it totally blew me away.

I've read translations of several P. K. Dick's books and had a really hard time keeping attention. "Martian Time-Slip" and "A Scanner darkly" worked best for me. "The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch" were too psychedelic and I never understood the ending...

docbennett
02-04-2013, 10:46 AM
"I have no Mouth and I must Scream" is a killer short story. I've read it in english and it totally blew me away.

I've read translations of several P. K. Dick's books and had a really hard time keeping attention. "Martian Time-Slip" and "A Scanner darkly" worked best for me. "The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch" were too psychedelic and I never understood the ending...

You can't read "3 stigmata" without having read the two prequels....he attempts to explain VALIS and assumes you already know what he's talking about. VALIS is the basis for his existential beliefs that plagued his last 9 years or so.

Try "The Man in the High Castle"....very interesting since you come from a former Soviet Block Country, and the main theme of the book (or the book within the book, as you'll see) is the alternative reality of the Germans, Japanese and Italians winning WW2, and the social aftermath that followed. Most of the aforementioned movies were based on short stories, with the exception of "Bladerunner" whichwas based on "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep" once again exploring what is real (human) vs. what isn't (Androids who think and feel and are superior to humans in most ways). Finally, if you liked "Total Recall" try the short story "We can remember it for you wholesale". If you enjoyed "Minority Report" (despite Tom Cruise) try the novella by the same name...you will see the perfect juxtaposition of his "reality" and "alternate reality theme".

for a bit more of PKD's last 9 years, try this R. Crumb pictorial.....it tries to explain how Philip met his "AD 100" counterpart, and tried to figure out what had happened.....pretty intruiging....

http://www.philipkdickfans.com/resources/miscellaneous/the-religious-experience-of-philip-k-dick-by-r-crumb-from-weirdo-17/


As you might imagine, PKD plays a very important role in my life, and in my attempts to explain the world we live in. I don't discuss it with too many people...however, in my line of work..the interface between "The Psychotic" and "the Religious" is too much of a "coincidence" to ignore the ramifications and possible connections.

that's all for now, before the men in the white jackets come to medicate me and take me away.

Desperado
02-04-2013, 10:57 AM
I recently read The Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins. A great set of books if you are looking for something that's not too heavy but entertaining.

Any avid reader will fly through these books, they are real page turners. I read the whole trilogy in a week. Well worth a look.

sergiodeblanc
02-04-2013, 12:54 PM
Okay, I'm putting Christopher Moore on my shortlist. My wife may have already read the vampire themed ones. She's a nut for anything vampire-related.

I have read two of those, the last one being "You Suck", pretty funny read and I'm not all that into vampires. Another great one is "The Fool" which is basically a a reworked version of "King Lear" I even got some Christopher Moore "Throx" (a pair of socks that come with a third sock in case you lose one!) the have the word "F%$# Sox" printed on them. The guys books have enriched my life so much in the same way as South Parks Matt and Trey.

alantig
02-04-2013, 08:45 PM
"Fluke" is very good as well. His vampire books are quite entertaining - they don't dwell on the vampireness of things. And I like vampire stories.

garrett
02-14-2013, 08:15 AM
Just finished Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle. Quick, easy, entertaining read, but with a bit of deeper meaning thrown in. I dug it.

docbennett
02-14-2013, 08:25 AM
Just finished Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle. Quick, easy, entertaining read, but with a bit of deeper meaning thrown in. I dug it.

If you liked that, you will absolutely LOVE another early work..."The Sirens of Titan". I consider "Slaughterhouse 5" to be possibly the best novel ever written. I consider most of his work post that era...starting with "Breakfast of Champions" to be of inferior quality, and not nearly as representative of his themes and concepts he those he developed through the first set of novels. Turning 50 circa 1972 for Kurt was a turning point, as his style changed dramatically. Anyone who has a copy of the Harlan Ellison Anthology "Again, Dangerous Visions" wojuld enjoy the Vonnegut contribution, "The Big Space F&@K".

sergiodeblanc
02-14-2013, 01:24 PM
You know what's a GREAT book? "Influence" by Mary Kate and Ashley Olsen, yeah those creepy lookin' freaky billionaire twins from Full House. It is basically a Q&A about how some of the most respected names in art and fashion got their start, and a wonderful source of inspiration. Karl Lagerfeld, Valentino, DVF, Terry Richardson, Christian Louboutin, and so many others spill their guts as to how they got started in a business that is just as tough, or tougher than being a musician. I rolled my eyes when someone brought it to the house, but some indian food and a lack of suitable bathroom material proved to me that you can't judge a book by its author(s).

garrett
02-14-2013, 02:52 PM
If you liked that, you will absolutely LOVE another early work..."The Sirens of Titan". I consider "Slaughterhouse 5" to be possibly the best novel ever written. I consider most of his work post that era...starting with "Breakfast of Champions" to be of inferior quality, and not nearly as representative of his themes and concepts he those he developed through the first set of novels. Turning 50 circa 1972 for Kurt was a turning point, as his style changed dramatically. Anyone who has a copy of the Harlan Ellison Anthology "Again, Dangerous Visions" wojuld enjoy the Vonnegut contribution, "The Big Space F&@K".

I'm about two dozen pages into Slaughterhouse-Five. Definitely a heavier read than Cradle already.

dmorton67
02-14-2013, 03:09 PM
I rather enjoyed King's latest installment of the dark tower "wind through the keyhole". It was a quick read for me.

Currently I'm breezing through David Baldacci's "Zero Day". First time reading this author and I like it's style so far. This book is a murder mystery.

docbennett
02-14-2013, 04:21 PM
I'm about two dozen pages into Slaughterhouse-Five. Definitely a heavier read than Cradle already.

When reading of Billy Pilgrim's adventures in time and space remember...Vonnegut was a real WW2 POW and really did survive the firebombing of Dresden first hand. Oh yeah.....he went into that in the introduction.

garrett
02-28-2013, 08:32 AM
Just finished Slaughterhouse-Five. It is a very Tralfamadorian book. I see Billy's life as an overall picture, and not as a series of events. Very cool how Vonnegut did that. Has anyone seen the film version? I think it seems like a pretty adaptable story.

I have Christopher Moore's Island of the Sequined Love Nun queued up next.

After that, I want to grab a copy of Danny Seraphine's Chicago Story. I've been a big fan of Chicago and Danny's drumming for a long time. I'm very interested to get an inside look at the band and the times they had.

dmorton67
02-28-2013, 08:42 AM
I'm currently reading "Light and Shade: Conversations with Jimmy Page". It's really interesting.

Goldtop
02-28-2013, 09:29 AM
I'm currently reading "Light and Shade: Conversations with Jimmy Page". It's really interesting.

I liked that one myself. As far as music goes, I've got several lined up waiting on me. Pete Townshend's autobiography, Rod Stewart, Ginger Baker, Jack Bruce, and an older one from Grace Slick. Should keep me occupied for awhile.

Goldtop Lloyd

docbennett
02-28-2013, 12:37 PM
Just finished Slaughterhouse-Five. It is a very Tralfamadorian book. I see Billy's life as an overall picture, and not as a series of events. Very cool how Vonnegut did that. Has anyone seen the film version? I think it seems like a pretty adaptable story.

I have Christopher Moore's Island of the Sequined Love Nun queued up next.

After that, I want to grab a copy of Danny Seraphine's Chicago Story. I've been a big fan of Chicago and Danny's drumming for a long time. I'm very interested to get an inside look at the band and the times they had.


The film was an excellent adaptation and did the novel a service. The director was faithful to the script, and was able to maintain the story line as best as could be, given the continual "slips through time".

If you liked the way Tralfamadorians view the universe, you will love "the Sirens of titan" an earlierVonnegut work and a better glimpse of how the viccissitudes of the universe are not always "coincidental".

As far as plot and theme....my favorite novel as far as scope of concept...would be Philip Jose Farmer's "To your Scattered Bodies Go". First, of the Riverworld series, it explores what would happen if everyone on Earth were ressurrected following their death along the banks of a vast river, on an unknown planet...with sufficient resources to rebuild civilization, but with the continual theme of "who did this...and why?"

Billions of people, along the banks of a vast, million mile river....sorted according to the time period they lived in....for the most part....and a cast of characters that includes Richard Francis Burton (who translated "1001 Arabian nights" and who was the first "civilized European to discovere the banks of the Nile), Alice Liddle (the woman who represented Dodgson's (Lewis Carrol's) "Alice" from "Alice in wonderland), and my favorite..Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain).

A great story, and one that lent itself to the series of sequals.

garrett
03-20-2013, 03:29 PM
I watched the film adaptation of Slaughterhouse-Five. Not bad, but the book was better of course. It's one that I would like someone to do a modern film adaptation.

Finished Island of the Sequined Love Nun last week. Great read; very engaging story telling. A nice dose of weirdness without being too strange. I'll have to read some more Christopher Moore later.

Now I'm reading a book about Andrew Jackson that I snagged for $2 at a thrift store. Hardback in fantastic condition, cover price $21.95 (I LOVE thrift shopping!). He was a fascinating person for sure. Reading about the founding fathers, I can see why they're so well respected. It was definitely a hard road back then. You truly had to be a hero to be President.

At the thrift store I also grabbed a copy of Stephen King's Bag of Bones in paperback that looks unread for $1. Will save that one when I feel in the King mood again. I need to grab Wind Through the Keyhole, too.

A friend at work has been talking about the recent Eagles documentary, so that's got me jonesing to read the Don Felder book.

I was also reminded recently about the Gregg Allman autobiography. That should be a good one, too.


Dang. Like music, my book want list keeps getting longer rather than shorter!