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Thread: The Motown Thread

  1. #41
    Senior Member sergiodeblanc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LSchefman View Post
    Motown was HUGE when I was in high school. It was a symbol of progress for my generation in Detroit in the way kids of different races began to relate to each other. Everyone was proud of Motown music. We were excited about it. In a big way, the music was a bridge for understanding at a time when big changes were occurring all over America. Yes, that sounds corny, but there you are. It was especially important in the magnet school I attended in Downtown Detroit, that had 4500 kids from all over the city, from all backgrounds, and had been the high school of some of the Motown stars.

    We formed integrated bands to perform both Motown music and other rock music. We started integrated clubs, and the clubs had dances that were fun and successful. It felt wonderful that everyone was closer; we'd be beaming with mutual admiration after a gig. Yeah, that sounds corny now, too, but it meant something in the 60s.

    I don't think it sounds corny at all, I think that is one of the great things about Motown and a true testament to the power of music. Some people tend to forget (or never knew) that there was a time in this country where in some states it was illegal to have an integrated group of musicians playing on the same stage!

    You (Les) and I have had a couple of good debates over a few subjects in the past that may have come off as uncomfortable for the people who were not involved, so I know first hand what it's like to go head to head with you and it's always FUN! So no worries if you think I'm offended, in all honesty I was looking forward to your insights about the subject matter when I originally posted this thread.

    Doc don't do Motown, that's cool. I don't like tomato's but I still love pizza, that doesn't make much sense either, but there it is. I would expect a little resistance if I posted a comment on a thread about tomato's belonging in the dairy section though.

    Carry on.

  2. #42
    Senior Member sergiodeblanc's Avatar
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    Can't forget about Teena!


  3. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by docbennett View Post
    Les...being your age, and living where you live, was kinda like me growing up near Greenwich Village in NYC as the Ramones, Blondie, Talking Heads, NY Dolls, David Johannsen....not to mention the forerunners Lou Reed, Velvet Underground and the entire CBGB, Mud Club and burgeoning Punk Scene exploded into the New York Village and Soho scene.
    I was really excited about the NYC New Wave/Punk scene myself. When my brother got out of his grad art program, he moved to NYC and rented a loft in SoHo. On my first trip there, the SoHo artist residence movement was a new thing; so much so that the cab driver refused to drive down his street at night (He lived on Spring Street near Broom) and let us off at the corner. This was around 1975. I visited him often during the entire time he was there (until 1989), and when the whole CBGB thing started happening, we went. Plus I was also into Velvet Underground and Lou Reed's stuff earlier on as well.

    Early on, we also went to Studio 54, which was a completely different scene. There was a lot going on then, as now. Music is diverse.

    But I'm also a veteran of the Greenwich Village scene, and went to NY to see friends from college during the summers; saw several of my favorite jazz and folk artists at places like the Village Vanguard during 1969-70.

    Plus a lot of the punk scene influence came from Detroit bands like the MC5 and Stooges, who were acquaintances because they lived across the street from me in Ann Arbor during 1968-69. I also knew the guys in Commander Cody's band from my Ann Arbor days, and appeared on the same bill with them. There was this whole rockabilly thing happening that I loved at the same time as all the other stuff.

    At one point in the early 70s I was in an all-acoustic bluegrass group. So...yeah. Lots of music. Did I mention my psychedelic/rock band that did Beatles, Who, Cream, Vanilla Fudge, Iron Butterfly, Sly, Chambers Brothers...I wasn't that crazy about being in a pop cover band by then, but it WAS fun doing that material.

    I somehow went from there to learning Erik Satie on piano...

    Like I said, I have a LOT of different influences and like (and play) a LOT of different musical styles. Open mind = good thing.
    Last edited by LSchefman; 01-14-2013 at 03:43 PM.

  4. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by sergiodeblanc View Post
    I don't think it sounds corny at all, I think that is one of the great things about Motown and a true testament to the power of music.
    In the parlance of the time, the music was very...um...groovy!

  5. #45
    Name Manglin' Putz alantig's Avatar
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    +1 on Super Freak for me. I don't consider myself a big Motown fan (especially when compared to real Motown fans), but I do have a great appreciation for what they did. When I was in Detroit for the Frozen Four, I made a point of going to the Motown Museum. Very cool to stand in the studio where that music was created.

    But the thing that stuck with me was that one of the guys in this band that recorded for Motown...



    turned out to be...
    Alan

    "I watched approximately 45 seconds of 'Rock Of Ages'. It was like getting punched in the soul." - Abby Krizner

  6. #46
    Senior Member sergiodeblanc's Avatar
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    Sometimes you need the healing power that only music can provide. I feel safe to say it's something all of us here understand.


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