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Thread: Beginner. Advise?

  1. #1
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    Beginner. Advise?

    I got Rocksmith to help me learn. I was also thinking about signing up for Jamplay. I know I should get face to face lessons, but not sure where I can find a teacher around here.
    Any suggestions on how to maximize my gains and avoid bad habits?

    Thanks
    Ed

  2. #2
    Well you said it yourself, personal lessons are probably the best way to learn. That said there are various resources available online.

    For beginners I always recommend Justin Sandercoe. I think his beginners course is excellent and a niece of mine made great progress using his method.

    http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-000-BeginnersCourse.php
    Last edited by Desperado; 01-03-2014 at 05:43 AM. Reason: Added link

  3. #3
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    Awesome! Thanks.
    I looked into jamplay and it seems shadey to me. Justin seems legit.

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    a Twitter friend of mine uses Jamplay and swears by it. he couldnt find a local tutor he liked tried Jamplay and hasn't looked back.
    I am not a luthier but i am in my own workshop.
    https://www.facebook.com/driffguitar

  5. #5
    Senior Member andy474x's Avatar
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    When I was starting out about 10 years ago, I used a book called "Guitar Basics" by Bruce Buckingham. A lot of books start out going note by note and you end up playing a lot of silly, single note songs, which have their place in learning, but aren't the most fun or stimulating. I recommend Bruce's book as a companion to one of those other books, because it jumps right into chords, strumming, and rhythm parts. Brings you up to speed a lot faster to a point where you could jam with friends or the radio. I think that played a big part in me being successful in learning rather than just giving up like some do, because I felt like I could do something with my skills a lot sooner.
    -I'm no expert, but it seems to work and I haven't electrocuted myself yet. Which is pretty much the standard I live by.

    SE Custom 24 25th Anniversary - SE Akesson+57/08's - SE 30 Head/Cab

  6. #6
    A♥ hoards guitars A♥ rugerpc's Avatar
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    A good, patient teacher is the best way to go, but finding one that is a match for your personality and his teaching skills can be daunting. Try looking at a local college which has a music education program and choose on of the undergrad/grad students who is actually going to be a teacher. Just being able to play well does NOT translate into being able to teach well.

    Books and video lessons are the next best thing, but miss an important aspect - the idea that you need to practice and accomplish something between scheduled lessons. That incentive is not there when you can just close the book or turn off the computer and walk away.

    Try also not to limit yourself to just one source, even for the basics. Different points of view and different approaches to the same material can lead to better understanding and faster learning.

    Watch for inconsistencies as well. I started as a drummer, so I have taught ALL of my teachers rhythm while they were teaching me guitar.

    You will also find errors in what you are taught and in the books and video lessons. People do get things wrong. It can be a powerful learning experience discovering the errors. There is an astonishing error concerning time signatures when they are first introduced in the Jamplay series on DVD with Chris Liepe. The supplemental material (in the form of PDFs on the DVD) have the definitions exactly reversed. There are other errors in the instruction as well, but I'll let you find them...
    Thbbbbbt...
    Check it out: Phillybri used to have a band: Resonance But he's soooo over them now!

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    Senior Member gush's Avatar
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    I would like to add my 2 cents. While you are learning to play by what ever means you decide please don't forget to train your ear and your brain. What I mean by that is spend time trying to figure out songs by just listening.. I have used youtube from time to time and people there don't always have it correct. It is nice to be able to listen to something and figure it out in your head or at least have a good idea.

    Good luck.

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    Thanks for the replys guys. I just don't want to get discouraged and quit like I have done several times in the past.

    I'm on the verge of buying my first PRS, narrowed down between the Torero and the Paul Allender SE.

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    And my two cents...
    First, remember to use your pinky on your fretting hand when playing single notes...many people don't use theirs, so starting off using it will help a lot down the road.
    Second, after you learn your first scale (blues, major, minor, etc...) pick up Jamey Abersold play along CDs...there is one where you can jam along in any key with these scales (vol. 24) ...it's not in your face backing music, but it's pretty cool to come up with distorted tones over an old jazz trio.

    Welcome, btw...Good guys around here...enjoy yourself, first and foremost.
    Last edited by Bill SAS 513; 01-04-2014 at 06:43 AM.

  10. #10
    Senior Member captdg's Avatar
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    Justin Sandercoe has helped me..What is the general consensus on Marty Schwartz?

  11. #11
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    Realize you will forever be a work in progress. You never stop learning and it takes a long time to get good. Have fun and enjoy the ride.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by hudman View Post
    Realize you will forever be a work in progress. You never stop learning and it takes a long time to get good. Have fun and enjoy the ride.
    This is a very factual statement. There should always be an area you'd like to improve. Most of the pros I've met feel the same way.

  13. #13
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    Excellent. Ive progressed more in these past 4 weeks than all the times if bought a guitar to only sell it 2 months later after not being able to play Megadeth. lol

    I've been following Justin Guitar's beginner course. Practicing switching from the E, A and D chords atm. I want to just jam out but I know its going to be months before I can play a simple song.
    Thanks again

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