Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: The 'Keepers' Thread

  1. #1

    The 'Keepers' Thread

    My thinking has changed.

    For a long time, even though my guitars all had personalities of their own, I regarded them as somewhat fungible items. Buy them, or sell them, according to my professional needs of the moment - nothing was irreplaceable. If something arose that made me feel the need for a different one, I didn't feel much emotion about selling one I had. It was all part of "the cause."

    I no longer feel that way. My PRS gear is now 100% "keepers."

    In part, this is a result of economics post-2008; it's just smarter not to lose a chunk of money selling a perfectly good instrument.

    But to a greater degree, it's about recent PRS instruments and amps that I have a stronger connection with. They are so good that I feel far more attached to them now. The reason I bring this up is the recent acquisition of a Sig. Ltd., and my thinking process about this.

    I took a chance on the Signature. Of course, I researched them online, but hadn't spent any time with one. I had the recommendations of friends like Twinfan, and that was about it. But I had a need for one for a business project (that by the way went very well) and thought I'd get it right. I also had, in the back of my mind, the idea that I could always sell one of the guitars if I felt badly about the investment, or sell the Sig if I didn't think it was for me.

    Turns out that the Sig was a fantastic choice. So now the question became, should I, or could I, part with one of the other two PRS in my studio? A while back, the answer would have surely been, "yes." Now it was a definite, "No." Not only can't I part with one of the others, I would feel an empty spot sonically, artistically and emotionally were I to do so. I finally realized -- I have keepers!

    I also thought back to the last electric guitar I sold, my Stripped 58. I miss it. It should have been a keeper. The money I got for it went to fund some studio bills, but if I'd been a little more resourceful, I'd have kept the guitar. Selling it was a huge mistake, it was a great one. Do I want to feel that regret again? Hell, no.

    My HX/DA? Only the best amp (for me) that I have ever played. I'd be a darn fool to ever part with it.

    Going back to the 2010-11 PRS models with the V12, and the pickups and other improvements, I have never, ever been so completely satisfied with any guitars. These models have a tone and a depth and a feel that I seem to instantly bond with. I love my instruments as never before. They are more useful to me professionally than ever before. They feel like more a part of who I am musically.

    It's not that PRS is simply making great guitars; it's that they made MY great guitars.

    Yes. They are keepers.

    And lest I appear to be too much of a "homer," there are PRS models and instruments I don't especially bond with.

    I understand that some players are on a constant tone experiment (though to some degree I think this is mere rationalization), but for me, the merry-go-round thing is way over. Et tu, Brute?
    Last edited by LSchefman; 02-15-2013 at 12:44 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member sergiodeblanc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Downers Grove Il.
    Posts
    5,156
    My first PRS, a 93' CE24 is what I compare all other guitars against, and it's never going to be sold.

    My "Blanc" CE22 is too special to ever go anywhere, plus nobody will pay a good price for it knowing that I spray painted it!

    My SE Orianthi is just way too much fun, I don't think anybody would give me more money for it than the joy brings me.

    I don't know why it is, but I can't think about selling/trading my PRS guitars the same way I have with other brands.

  3. #3
    Opaque John Beef's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Arizona USA
    Posts
    1,425
    Yeah, my 1st PRS, my black CU22, continues to be the standard by which I judge all other guitars. I've made a few mods to it, namely the pickup swap from D2s to DGTs, plus some lampshades, but never has such a stock, off the shelf guitar captured my heart the way this one has. The fact that I've had it over six years only further ingrains this instrument into my overall musical experience. I've owned a few that came close to dethroning it, especially a rosewood necked McCarty that was a nicer guitar all around than this, but this one just fits.




    I go into every guitar purchase I make optimistically, thinking that the guitar will be a keeper, and mostly they haven't been after a given period of time.

    I firmly believe my most recent purchase is also a keeper. For now, my GAS flame is extinguished. However, I've done this dance enough to know this may be just a honeymoon.

    The Bovine Fury <-- stream and download our album "Eleven by Twelve" for free.
    05 Custom 22 with DGT pickups ~ 07 Mira with old birds ~ 08 SE Baritone Fralin/Suhr pickups ~ 03 SE Santana

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Sacto, Ca.
    Posts
    50
    I have a Black 20th Custom 24, always will!

  5. #5
    Cream Crackered Mikegarveyblues's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Warrington, Nr Liverpool UK
    Posts
    2,160
    My Strat and Bernie are keepers for sure.

    I've invested a lot into both of them to get them sounding and playing just how I like. I may one day get guitars that are better than those two but I love them too much to get rid. At the risk of sounding melodramatic - they've become a part of me.
    Modified SE Bernie Marsden, SE Custom 24 2012, Fender Strat
    Laney Lionheart L5T-112, Fender Mustang 1
    Wishing for a Blue Bernie!
    Click here for SE Bernie Marsden demo!
    Lessons, covers, backing tracks, etc...www.youtube.com/mikegarveyblues

  6. #6
    Well nobody would ever buy my PS, because on the back of the headstock it says "custom built for KingsleyD" so I guess that means that one is a keeper. Unless of course I become a late-in-life rock star so people would want my guitars just because they are mine.

    On the one hand, I have at least a dozen and probably closer to two dozen guitars that I can't imagine selling. On the other hand, because I have so many great guitars, if any one of them were to go away I'd learn to make do.

    I did tell a friend who is a noted PRS dealer the other day that I thought it would be very difficult for Uncle Paul to build a guitar that I would rather have than the ones I have now.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by kingsleyd View Post
    Unless of course I become a late-in-life rock star so people would want my guitars just because they are mine..
    Well, you know, the rock star thing is soon going to be passe. I've been thinking, "Sure our generation's getting old and starting to drop like flies. But we're still around and will be for a long time. We need to resurrect Old People's Music."

    And with that in mind, I've decided to strap on an accordion and be this guy, only with a twist:



    Yes, the twist is that it will be the Zombie Lawrence Welk Show!!

    And we will need a Zombie guitar player, drummer, piano player, bass player, horn section...

    We can do old rock tunes instead of polkas, but slow. For the members of our aging generation. In powder blue Zombie outfits, etc. We will make a fortune! You with me, Kingsley?

  8. #8
    I'm in! My shtick is, I'll be playing a different guitar every show.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    pioneer valley
    Posts
    254
    Quote Originally Posted by LSchefman View Post
    My thinking has changed.

    For a long time, even though my guitars all had personalities of their own, I regarded them as somewhat fungible items. Buy them, or sell them, according to my professional needs of the moment - nothing was irreplaceable. If something arose that made me feel the need for a different one, I didn't feel much emotion about selling one I had. It was all part of "the cause."

    I no longer feel that way. My PRS gear is now 100% "keepers."

    In part, this is a result of economics post-2008; it's just smarter not to lose a chunk of money selling a perfectly good instrument.

    But to a greater degree, it's about recent PRS instruments and amps that I have a stronger connection with. They are so good that I feel far more attached to them now. The reason I bring this up is the recent acquisition of a Sig. Ltd., and my thinking process about this.

    I took a chance on the Signature. Of course, I researched them online, but hadn't spent any time with one. I had the recommendations of friends like Twinfan, and that was about it. But I had a need for one for a business project (that by the way went very well) and thought I'd get it right. I also had, in the back of my mind, the idea that I could always sell one of the guitars if I felt badly about the investment, or sell the Sig if I didn't think it was for me.

    Turns out that the Sig was a fantastic choice. So now the question became, should I, or could I, part with one of the other two PRS in my studio? A while back, the answer would have surely been, "yes." Now it was a definite, "No." Not only can't I part with one of the others, I would feel an empty spot sonically, artistically and emotionally were I to do so. I finally realized -- I have keepers!

    I also thought back to the last electric guitar I sold, my Stripped 58. I miss it. It should have been a keeper. The money I got for it went to fund some studio bills, but if I'd been a little more resourceful, I'd have kept the guitar. Selling it was a huge mistake, it was a great one. Do I want to feel that regret again? Hell, no.

    My HX/DA? Only the best amp (for me) that I have ever played. I'd be a darn fool to ever part with it.

    Going back to the 2010-11 PRS models with the V12, and the pickups and other improvements, I have never, ever been so completely satisfied with any guitars. These models have a tone and a depth and a feel that I seem to instantly bond with. I love my instruments as never before. They are more useful to me professionally than ever before. They feel like more a part of who I am musically.

    It's not that PRS is simply making great guitars; it's that they made MY great guitars.

    Yes. They are keepers.

    And lest I appear to be too much of a "homer," there are PRS models and instruments I don't especially bond with.

    I understand that some players are on a constant tone experiment (though to some degree I think this is mere rationalization), but for me, the merry-go-round thing is way over. Et tu, Brute?
    I could'nt have said this any better,Les !!!!!! We are kindred spirits,instrument wise!!!!!

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by kingsleyd View Post
    I'm in! My shtick is, I'll be playing a different guitar every show.
    The fans will love that. Zombies with good looking instruments.

    Quote Originally Posted by bluefade View Post
    I could'nt have said this any better,Les !!!!!! We are kindred spirits,instrument wise!!!!!
    Yup, we are indeed!

  11. #11
    Senior Member vchizzle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    WI
    Posts
    2,182
    I don't sell many guitars to begin with, but I'm not buying them every other week either. I've been this way mostly after I started playing PRS. I've let a few go, none that I regret terribly though. Maybe my SAS - that one went because I needed a different tool and couldn't afford to keep it. I will get another one day. Maybe a SAS NF instead, I think I like them better. The longer you play a guitar the greater the intimacy becomes, learning it's nuances and intricacies - what makes them special. I still view them as tools to an extent so it's kind of hard to explain...

    I guess I won't get rid of a guitar unless I don't truly bond with it or I haven't let myself REALLY get to know it. I have done that with several guitars only because I wanted something different or it was too close to something I have already.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by vchizzle View Post
    The longer you play a guitar the greater the intimacy becomes, learning it's nuances and intricacies - what makes them special
    This is very true.

    There's a difference between merely owning a guitar, and truly using it as a musical partner and creative tool.

    I'm all for moving something out if it doesn't serve those needs; but I'm learning to appreciate the ones that do.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •