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Thread: Pedalboard Revision 349,174 And The HX/DA

  1. #1

    Pedalboard Revision 349,174 And The HX/DA

    Yeah, I know. I haven't revised my pedalboard 349.174 times. It only feels like I have...

    I got this Fulltone FullDrive 3 about a week ago, and started tweaking it to sound its best in combination with my HX/DA. Right now I'm feeling pretty good about this combination of gear on the ol' pedalboard:



    Left to right, an Eventide TimeFactor multi delay, an Eventide ModFactor multi modulation pedal, a two-loop switch box, the FullDrive 3, and in the back, a Boss tuner. The power boxes are Voodoo Labs' ISO 5 and PP Digital.

    I swapped out the TC Nova Delay for this Eventide box, that does a lot more, and sounds a bit less digital when it's supposed to. The ModFactor has been around for a while, but I'm now using it for more things, and wasn't using the analog stuff I had that did the same thing, since this is so much more programmable. Both of the Eventide boxes are superb creative tools for me, and I'm really getting into using them more and more.

    The FD3 is becoming my favorite OD and clean boost, and it's really all I need on the board right now for that. The HX/DA really doesn't need an OD pedal, but it's nice to have the options of different colors that certain pedals give the player, and I like the clean boost in particular, it's very handy to vary the tone of the amp just a touch.

    The looper lets me take the buffered Boss tuner in or out of the signal path, to affect the tone, or not, depending on needs (I like what it does for the split coil tones on humbucker guitars). I have the Eventide boxes on the other loop, though both are true bypass the way I have them set up. The reason for this is that switching them out makes the signal path shorter, and that affects the tone a tiny bit when I'm not using a buffer.

    Cables for the analog path are all PRS/Van Damme. The digital boxes are connected and sent back to the switch box with Lava Ultramafic, also a great cable that I ordered to length (I always add a little extra length as a service loop so I can pull a pedal off the board a few inches to make adjustments without disconnecting everything).

    I find that the Eventide stuff works very well with the HX/DA's tone. With some amps, I preferred the TC stuff, or all analog. But this combination is working for me right now.

    A Fulltone Clyde Deluxe is an on-again, off-again kind of thing. Clients rarely want to hear wah on ads. It's unfortunately too associated with porn in their minds.

    So that's what I'm running these days. It's a very simple setup, but extremely flexible and it sounds great.

    How about my fellow HX/DA owners?
    Last edited by LSchefman; 11-20-2013 at 09:02 AM.
    If something is too hard to do, then it's not worth doing. You just stick that guitar in the closet next to your short-wave radio, your karate outfit and your unicycle and we'll go inside and watch TV.
    -- Homer J. Simpson

  2. #2
    Senior Member jfb's Avatar
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    I love simple rigs. I am not a tweaker at all, but love the format of the Eventide Factor stuff. Paired with the HX/DA it's like vintage had a date with modern. Or something like that.
    Plank Owner

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by jfb View Post
    I love simple rigs. I am not a tweaker at all, but love the format of the Eventide Factor stuff. Paired with the HX/DA it's like vintage had a date with modern. Or something like that.
    You hit the nail on the head! It's like a computer running a steam locomotive.

    Both of the Eventide boxes have so many different algorithms that they actually do a lot more than the very loaded analog board I put together a few years back. Frankly, I'm not a fan of getting on my knees with a guitar strapped on, and tweaking knobs, either. There are a few good things about these boxes for folks like me:

    First, the presets sound absolutely great. Second, the things are very easy to tweak and operate when you need to, using dedicated knobs.

    You can also set them up with USB and a computer (free librarian program), and/or use MIDI. They also have expression pedal inputs, inputs for momentary switches for additional functions, etc. Once you set them up the way you like, you're in business. Lots of options.
    If something is too hard to do, then it's not worth doing. You just stick that guitar in the closet next to your short-wave radio, your karate outfit and your unicycle and we'll go inside and watch TV.
    -- Homer J. Simpson

  4. #4
    Senior Member jfb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LSchefman View Post
    You hit the nail on the head! It's like a computer running a steam locomotive.

    Both of the Eventide boxes have so many different algorithms that they actually do a lot more than the very loaded analog board I put together a few years back. Frankly, I'm not a fan of getting on my knees with a guitar strapped on, and tweaking knobs, either. There are a few good things about these boxes for folks like me:

    First, the presets sound absolutely great. Second, the things are very easy to tweak and operate when you need to, using dedicated knobs.

    You can also set them up with USB and a computer (free librarian program), and/or use MIDI. They also have expression pedal inputs, inputs for momentary switches for additional functions, etc. Once you set them up the way you like, you're in business. Lots of options.
    Have you ever tried the pedals closely related to these made by Strymon - TimeLine, Mobius, BigSky? I might have a hard time articulating why I prefer them, but if I had to do it in a word - chewy. The Strymon items to my ears just sound a bit more chewy. I do miss the Space pedal by Eventide. It did a number of things I really liked.
    Plank Owner

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by jfb View Post
    Have you ever tried the pedals closely related to these made by Strymon - TimeLine, Mobius, BigSky? I might have a hard time articulating why I prefer them, but if I had to do it in a word - chewy. The Strymon items to my ears just sound a bit more chewy. I do miss the Space pedal by Eventide. It did a number of things I really liked.
    I have heard them, but haven't played them with my own amp, guitar, etc. I think they're great from what I've heard, though.

    The Eventide algorithms are pretty complex, and that's why I like them. I used an H3000 d/se for quite a few years, and there are things that Eventide pedals do that pretty much nothing else does.

    But heck, they're all good!
    If something is too hard to do, then it's not worth doing. You just stick that guitar in the closet next to your short-wave radio, your karate outfit and your unicycle and we'll go inside and watch TV.
    -- Homer J. Simpson

  6. #6
    Senior Member Rider1260's Avatar
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    Les I need to help you fill in that open real-estate on your board

    LOL

    Last edited by Rider1260; 11-20-2013 at 05:07 PM.
    PRS Family - SCT, 408, 305, CU22, MEII
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  7. #7
    Name Manglin' Putz alantig's Avatar
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    Man, Les - I wasn't ready for this thread yet. I'm not sure how best to derail it!

    Some of those Eventide pedals look really cool. If I hadn't invested in a G-System, I'd probably have a couple, but since I haven't taken the time to sit down and really program things to what I want, I can't say that they'd buy me anything I don't have. I need to spend some time on that.
    Alan

    "I watched approximately 45 seconds of 'Rock Of Ages'. It was like getting punched in the soul." - Abby Krizner

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Rider1260 View Post
    Les I need to help you fill in that open real-estate on your board

    LOL

    What do all those pedals do?

    Quote Originally Posted by alantig View Post
    Some of those Eventide pedals look really cool. If I hadn't invested in a G-System, I'd probably have a couple, but since I haven't taken the time to sit down and really program things to what I want, I can't say that they'd buy me anything I don't have. I need to spend some time on that.
    They do cool things, and they sound different from the TC stuff. So the sounds are unique, very "Eventide," if you know what I mean...

    What Eventide did was port the algorithms from their very high end studio H3000 boxes; the algorithms were pretty complex, with lots of filtering, etc. I relied on an H3000 D/SE for many years in my studio, going back to when I had a big analog console. If I could use a word to sum up the Eventide sound, it's "warm."

    I also had the TC M5000 in the studio, from which a lot of the TC G-System sounds were derived. It was a great sounding box, and very "TC," with a crisper and brighter sound than the Eventide. So I'd pick the box to use depending on the track.

    I had a difficult time deciding whether to go with the Eventide combination, or with a G-System. I like the compactness of the G-System, but I'd still have to hang some analog pedals on it, and the editing still is more menu-driven than the immediate gratification I get with the Eventide boxes, where you can grab a knob for most functions with each algorithm.

    I decided on the Eventide in part for that immediacy, and in part for the warmer sound that I think works hand-in-glove with the HX/DA. I did have a Nova System for a while, and it sounded great, but the menu diving made me crazy. On the other hand, all of these digital boxes have things that drive me completely nuts. With the Eventide, the crazy thing is that on the box itself, you can only step up in preset banks, not down. Well, there are 50 friggin' banks to step through. You have to use a momentary footswitch to step down in the banks.

    EDIT: I found a way to scroll banks down on the Eventide website using the right footswitch and the encoder knob. Whew! This is much simpler, when not using midi or an extra footswitch, and I'm glad I checked it out!

    Or you can simply move your presets to a few banks, and limit the number you step through, or you can use MIDI. They should have had another button for that, though, like I said, I use a footswitch or MIDI to do it.
    Last edited by LSchefman; 11-21-2013 at 06:03 PM.
    If something is too hard to do, then it's not worth doing. You just stick that guitar in the closet next to your short-wave radio, your karate outfit and your unicycle and we'll go inside and watch TV.
    -- Homer J. Simpson

  9. #9
    Senior Member sergiodeblanc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LSchefman View Post
    So the sounds are unique, very "Eventide," if you know what I mean...
    Frankly I'm kinda surprised you chose them for your modulation needs. I've never tried their pedals but the H series was as common place as the SPX and PCM's, never did reach for the Eventide for anything but pitch and delay stuff, I do occasionally still use the H3000B for the Max Headroom "Stutter" preset (to leave voicemails from the studio).

    How are these things for switching? Do they leave big gaps when loading the next algorithm like the rack stuff?

  10. #10
    SuperD Boogie's Avatar
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    I had a Pitch Factor on my live board for several months and get what you mean by 'warm', Les. Eventide approaches their take on finesse differently than TC and for the H3000/MicroPitch stuff, warmth is more pleasing to my ears. The Pitch Factor was used to thicken my sound in a power trio band and did a pretty good job, but it was such a tweak machine. Once that band fizzled out, I sold the pedal.

    Regarding the Strymon stuff, it's been years (like when I first experienced an H3000) since I was so impressed with a product line. And Jesse's new Big Sky is über impressive. It brings so many options for ambience control on one package in a VERY musical way. Les, for studio stuff, you should check it out. It would make a good production tool...well composed presets with full tweakability.

    Serg, with the Pitch Factor, drastic program changes did have a slight delay (hundreds of milliseconds). I didn't attempt a MIDI controller connection so I'm not sure if that would make a difference. The silent switches worked perfectly. For a stompbox, it was very impressive, flexible and professional.
    + '01 Custom 24 + '11 DGT Standard (Mr. Clean) + '09 SE One + Super Dallas + Stealth 2x12+

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by sergiodeblanc View Post
    Frankly I'm kinda surprised you chose them for your modulation needs. I've never tried their pedals but the H series was as common place as the SPX and PCM's, never did reach for the Eventide for anything but pitch and delay stuff, I do occasionally still use the H3000B for the Max Headroom "Stutter" preset (to leave voicemails from the studio).
    Well, to each their own, Serg. I think I paid around $3000 1992 bucks for the H3000, fully loaded, which made it pretty high end at the time. Good studios had them, yes, but very few were found in project rooms like mine. I also had a couple of the SPX and of course the PCM models, because back then you needed hardware for a lot of tracks.

    Actually, my favorite algorithm on the H3000 was the reverb. I loved it with vocals. There was no metallic "wash," as with a real plate (my partner at the time had two of the EMTs), nor was there the harshness I sometimes got with the Lexicon stuff, where you could hear the tails get raspy. It simply sounded like a good room sounds on a mic. Another favorite was the Crystal Echoes business, there were nice choruses, etc. Basically, I liked that sound from Day One. I honestly never used the pitch much, as my ad singers were about as spot on as you could get, and could double their vocals for thickening like mad, but did use the delay a lot.

    Quote Originally Posted by sergiodeblanc View Post
    How are these things for switching? Do they leave big gaps when loading the next algorithm like the rack stuff?
    No, the switching is instantaneous on the two pedals I have.

    Quote Originally Posted by Boogie View Post
    Jesse's new Big Sky is über impressive. It brings so many options for ambience control on one package in a VERY musical way. Les, for studio stuff, you should check it out. It would make a good production tool...well composed presets with full tweakability.
    I'll check one out, though for ambience I'm usually using tools in the mix. I'm impressed with Strymon stuff, too.
    Last edited by LSchefman; 11-21-2013 at 03:53 PM.
    If something is too hard to do, then it's not worth doing. You just stick that guitar in the closet next to your short-wave radio, your karate outfit and your unicycle and we'll go inside and watch TV.
    -- Homer J. Simpson

  12. #12
    And for my next trick...back on the board...the Fulltone Catalyst!

    The Catalyst sits in an interesting no-man's-land between a boost with a bit o' crunch and EQ, and a fuzz. I mainly use it to add some boost, top end, and crackle to split-coil humbucker tones, with the guitar volume rolled back, or to take some bass away from a neck pickup in humbucker mode (the pedal has tone controls that work pretty nicely!).

    But with the guitar volume rolled up, and set in the "flame" position, it's pretty interesting little fuzzbox. So here's a new pic:



    And yes, we're all about the orange this month.
    Last edited by LSchefman; 11-21-2013 at 04:31 PM.
    If something is too hard to do, then it's not worth doing. You just stick that guitar in the closet next to your short-wave radio, your karate outfit and your unicycle and we'll go inside and watch TV.
    -- Homer J. Simpson

  13. #13
    Dislocated Boy Tosca's Avatar
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    Agreed Les...the Catalyst is unique enough to win a space on my way overcrowded "A" board (revision #???????).
    Blues is easy to play, but hard to feel.
    Jimi Hendrix

  14. #14
    Tosca, the interesting thing is that we appear to both set our Catalysts up the same way!

    And what a board - you are now officially my Pedalboard Hero.

    I'd love to know more about that big switcher you have in front, as well as how you control your rig. Everything looks wonderfully complex; my kinda thing! So spill the beans!
    If something is too hard to do, then it's not worth doing. You just stick that guitar in the closet next to your short-wave radio, your karate outfit and your unicycle and we'll go inside and watch TV.
    -- Homer J. Simpson

  15. #15
    Senior Member sergiodeblanc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boogie View Post
    Serg, with the Pitch Factor, drastic program changes did have a slight delay (hundreds of milliseconds). I didn't attempt a MIDI controller connection so I'm not sure if that would make a difference. The silent switches worked perfectly. For a stompbox, it was very impressive, flexible and professional.
    Cool to know, that's the pedal I'd be most interested in.

    Quote Originally Posted by LSchefman View Post
    Well, to each their own, Serg. I think I paid around $3000 1992 bucks for the H3000, fully loaded, which made it pretty high end at the time. Good studios had them, yes, but very few were found in project rooms like mine. I also had a couple of the SPX and of course the PCM models, because back then you needed hardware for a lot of tracks.

    Actually, my favorite algorithm on the H3000 was the reverb. I loved it with vocals. There was no metallic "wash," as with a real plate (my partner at the time had two of the EMTs), nor was there the harshness I sometimes got with the Lexicon stuff, where you could hear the tails get raspy. It simply sounded like a good room sounds on a mic. Another favorite was the Crystal Echoes business, there were nice choruses, etc. Basically, I liked that sound from Day One. I honestly never used the pitch much, as my ad singers were about as spot on as you could get, and could double their vocals for thickening like mad, but did use the delay a lot.



    No, the switching is instantaneous on the two pedals I have.
    Ha! I wasn't trying to imply my project studio had one, I actually went to a place called Pyramid Audio with my first $3000 limit credit card to buy one... but chickened out.

    I shouldn't have said they were common, an Eventide(s) meant you were in a pretty nice place, but they were something that you were expected to know how to use if you were recording sh!ty singers or guitar harmonies like I would. It was also Chicago in the 90's so everybody had an Industrial band, and those dudes had gear! The H3000 was pretty much the only tool for pitch... I can't even say correction because of how we now call it,... but pitch adjusting?

    I'm a huge fan of Eventide stuff... I just found it kinda hard to find a good flanger tone on 'em.

  16. #16
    Dislocated Boy Tosca's Avatar
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    Thanks Les...I have a real pedalboard "problem". I currently have three separate pedal rigs that I use, switching in and out various pedals. This is my "A" rig used only for home recording that I run into 2 at a time (in stereo) of the 5 amps currently comprising my "low wattage tower of doom". I'm sure it's my way of compensating for a lack of skill. I love the fuzz sound of the Catalyst on that setting...it's a decent boost too...but I have multiple other boost pedals I like (as you can see). The "big switcher" is made by a company called The Gig Rig from England (www.thegigrig.com). The pedals are all plugged into 10 separate effects loops (the last one with stereo output) across the top of the unit, each of the preset switches across the bottom can engage any combination of these effects you choose (with DIP switches). It has a built in pre-amp buffer/boost and each preset has an individual post volume to level out the volumes of each preset. This version has control switch outs for controlling amp channel switching and will send midi cc messages for each preset...I'm currently driving myself crazy setting up my Strymon TimeLine and the Eventide Space and H9 pedals to switch with each preset like I want. I don't think they make this model anymore, but they have new ones, and pretty cool power supply options for just about every pedal out there.

    It's complicated...but my idea of a good time.
    Blues is easy to play, but hard to feel.
    Jimi Hendrix

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by sergiodeblanc View Post
    I'm a huge fan of Eventide stuff... I just found it kinda hard to find a good flanger tone on 'em.
    Hmmm...I'll check out the flanger tones on the pedal and get back to you. For some reason I rarely use flanger!

    Lately I'm addicted to using the FD3 for a smooth but not too congested lead tone, bridge humbucker at around 6, then into the Eventide set at a very light chorus, with very little of the chorus sound in the mix, and then to the delay box with dual repeats, set kind of Pink Floyd-ish.

    I get this squidgy smoldering solo tone with it, kind of a nod to Floyd as well as Trower, but neither, really. Sort of my own thing, very spacey and easy on the ears, but still singing, and it hits the HX/DA just right. The result sounds just gorgeous, IMHO.
    If something is too hard to do, then it's not worth doing. You just stick that guitar in the closet next to your short-wave radio, your karate outfit and your unicycle and we'll go inside and watch TV.
    -- Homer J. Simpson

  18. #18
    Name Manglin' Putz alantig's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LSchefman View Post
    I had a difficult time deciding whether to go with the Eventide combination, or with a G-System. I like the compactness of the G-System, but I'd still have to hang some analog pedals on it, and the editing still is more menu-driven than the immediate gratification I get with the Eventide boxes, where you can grab a knob for most functions with each algorithm.
    Oh, I definitely hang analog boxes off the G-System. Especially distortion/fuzz/OD - stuff that the G-System doesn't do.

    And while I do use the boost button on it, I suspect that now has a limited lifetime. I talked to a guy at Experience who builds his own pedals, and I got to try a few at the amp museum thing. He's got a couple boost that add some high end sparkle that is just gorgeous. Two slightly different form factors of the same thing - on one, the boost stage with the sparkle is variable and there's a constant second stage boost. On the other, the first stage is constant and the second stage is variable. If I can ever decide which is better for me, I'm getting one of those. The G-System boost, while very transparent to my ears, just feels anemic now.

    I've made due thus far with using some form of their presets - usually changing what's actually on, or sometimes tweaking a setting or two. But it's not as easy as just grabbing a knob and turning. I do want to invest the time to program it for some things I want, but every time I start to seriously think about it, I find something else I'd rather record or work on. But one of these days.
    Alan

    "I watched approximately 45 seconds of 'Rock Of Ages'. It was like getting punched in the soul." - Abby Krizner

  19. #19
    Member prsrocker1988's Avatar
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    Nice! My pedalboard is a bit more, um, full but I love yours. I run a '68 Super Reverb (Fender) most of the time and I run it pretty clean and of course mic it. I mainly get drive and gusto from pedals, so I have a nice variety to get me through the night.

    As we talked about the other day I'm a big Fulltone fan. I have the FD2 Mosfet, OCD v4, PlimSoul, and FatBoost v2. Really dig my FatBoost. It's the least desirable version of the FB, but IMO it's the best. It's more of an overdrive. It says right on the box "Tweed crunch", and it delivers. My buddy had one in his store and he sold it to me for $50. Can't pass that up. It's probably not as clean as a FB v1 or v3 but it works. I think the OCD is up to v7 now, and v4 isn't well loved, but again through my old Blackface Fenders it kills. If it's good enough for Don Felder, it's good enough for me.

    I really want to grab a FD3, but I may just wait and see if the boost section will come out in a separate unit.

    I've never tried the Catalyst, Secret Freq, or GT500. Sometime I'll try them.

  20. #20
    Oh yeah, my board is empty lately compared to what I used to have on it. Honestly, that is in part because of the ModFactor. I usually don't have more than one OD or fuzz on the board, but used to have trems, choruses, etc. that I don't need now.

    I had the OCDv.4 and I loved it, in fact, it's now at my son's studio I think (I sometimes send him my best stuff, just because).

    I'm sure the Fat Boost 2 is great...to me, the little bit of stuff it adds is a good thing. So I'm with you. Sometimes the supposed "best" version is a bunch of internet hype. A player has to make up his or her own mind with this stuff.
    If something is too hard to do, then it's not worth doing. You just stick that guitar in the closet next to your short-wave radio, your karate outfit and your unicycle and we'll go inside and watch TV.
    -- Homer J. Simpson

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