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Thread: Ancestry (Where are you really from...?)

  1. #41
    Just mailed out my DNA sample on Saturday ...can't wait for the results!

  2. #42
    Senior Member jfb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sergiodeblanc View Post
    We all are brother.
    Plank Owner

  3. #43
    NJ Devil DISTORT6's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    Just mailed out my DNA sample on Saturday ...can't wait for the results!



    Not like the other kids...

  4. #44
    LMAO!! No I'm talking about the Human Genome Project but that's hysterical!!

  5. #45
    deus ex machina
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    My family tree descends mostly from Maryland and Virginia “old stock.” We have had a sustained presence in Maryland for at least three and a half centuries. The earliest member that I have been able to document thus far came to St. Mary’s County as an indentured servant around 1660. He sold his freedom dues (50 acres of land in St. Mary’s County) in the late 1660s and moved to Kent County where he married a woman who was born on Maryland's Eastern Shore.

    I am fairly certain that a large percentage of the roots of my family tree came this continent in some form of bondage, as the majority of the people who came to Maryland and Virginia before 1800 did so in some form bondage due to the fact that both colonies granted land based on the "headright" system. Some of these bondservants (non-religious definition) were the redemptioners that most American school children are taught about in public school. Redemptioners were colonists who paid for their passage to the colonies by voluntarily signing contracts of indenture. However, most bondservants were not volunteers. England used its colonies as dumping grounds for convicts. These convicts were known as “transportees” because they were sentenced to“transportation” at the Old Bailey. Other bondservants were Irish, Welsh, and Scots prisoners of war. A lot of poor children were either snatched from the streets of England (a practice known as “kid-nabbing,” which is the origin of the word “kidnap”) or sold into bondage by their parents and pressed into service in the colonies until age 21. England also used the colonies as a way to clean out its workhouses. The residents of these poor houses were routinely forced into indentured servitude in the colonies.

    Americans who are interested in researching their genealogies should go into the process with an open mind. Unless one knows the name and country of origin of an immigrant in one's family, one should assume the folklore that has been passed down is wrong. Very few Americans have family trees in which all of the roots terminate in the nineteenth century. I lived most of my life believing the majority of my ancestors came to this country in the nineteenth century. I was told that my maternal grandfather was Irish. I wasted a lot time going down that dead-end street before I learned enough about genealogy to know how to find the clues, which led me to parts of his family tree that predate the Irish Potato Famine. The migration out of Ireland during Irish Potato Famine is the source of most Americans who are of true Irish descent. The Irish who came to this continent in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were mostly Scots-Irish. Scot-Irish are not true Irishmen--they are mostly lowland Scots and Northern Englishmen (Border Reivers) who were relocated to Ulster Plantation in Northern Ireland. If one's Irish side of the family isn't Catholic, one is not of true Irish descent. Appalachia is home to the largest concentration of Americans of Scots-Irish descent.

    One last piece of trivia is that Great Britain established Australia as the new dumping ground for its convicts and surplus poor after we won our independence. The fact that Great Britain established New South Wales as a penal colony the same year that the U.S. Constitution was ratified is not a coincidence.
    Last edited by Em7; 03-27-2013 at 11:51 PM.

  6. #46
    Third generation American of Japanese ancestry. Born and raised in Hawaii with no plans to move from these beautiful isles.
    I can do all things through Him who strengthens me.

  7. #47
    deus ex machina
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    Quote Originally Posted by george4th View Post
    England and Germany no French as far as anyone has ever been able to determine albeit 4 generations in Louisiana (South) you would think I'd have some Cajun blood somewhere. Still a Cajun no matter what the genealogy says.
    G
    Germans have been in Louisiana since at least the early eighteenth century. German pioneers helped to create the Cajun culture. If you have ever had "cracklins," you have eaten something that these Germans pioneers introduced to the area.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Coast

  8. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by MarkFromHawaii View Post
    Third generation American of Japanese ancestry. Born and raised in Hawaii with no plans to move from these beautiful isles.
    I was lucky enough to live there for a little while. I miss the weather and the beach but I REALLY miss California Beach Rockin' Sushi on Ward Street. I used to belly up to the bar once a week (when Hiro was working) and order "Sushi Omakase". It was always an epic adventure in sushi.

    #BestSushiEver

    [sigh]
    One Life

  9. #49
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    As most of Brazilians, I am highly miscigenated. Blood from Lebanon, Portugal, Spain, native indians and some African Country roots that I can't localize.

  10. #50
    deus ex machina
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brazilian wood View Post
    As most of Brazilians, I am highly miscigenated. Blood from Lebanon, Portugal, Spain, native indians and some African Country roots that I can't localize.
    A large number of Americans who are outwardly European in appearance carry near sub-Saharan genetic admixture. Abraham Lincoln, Elvis Presley, Tom Hanks, and Heather Locklear are prime examples of this little acknowledged fact. All of these people are/were of Melungeon extraction. Melungeons are genetically African, European, and Native American.

    Near sub-Saharan genetic admixture is not limited to Americans of Melungeon extraction. Interracial marriages were very common in the colonies until anti-miscegenation laws were enacted in Virginia (1691) and Maryland (1692) as part of a divide-and-conquer scheme that was put into place by the gentry after Bacon's Rebellion.

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