Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 39 of 39

Thread: ATTN HISTORIANS: I NEED SOME HELP IDENTIFYING A PRS THAT I ONCE HAD

  1. #21
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    19
    Gentlemen, thank so-much for your continued patience with me on this - I'm really grateful.

    Regarding the mahogany vs. alder issue, I'll say this much, I've owned a lot of different guitars including many mahogany units (Les Paul's, Anderson drop tops, etc.) and I've done a lot of wood-working as well, and although it is certainly possible to painstakingly "seal" the extensive pores that are present in native Honduran or Philippine mahogany, it requires a fair bit of extra labor (additional sanding and sealing and re-sanding, etc.), especially if you want to achieve the brittle, ultra-smooth, high-gloss finish that was present on my earlier Custom-24. In addition, from my experience, its notably lighter-weight than alder is. That said, are you guys saying that you're confident that the folks at PRS went to that added effort, and that despite its heavier weight, my Custom-24 had to have been mahogany?

  2. #22
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by LSchefman View Post
    . . . PS. Sergio is right, if you had a set neck, you had a mahogany body. Are you sure it had a maple top? Maybe you had an all mahogany version?
    Nope, no question that it was a set neck and no question that it was a flamed maple top. The top itself was gorgeous, as was the natural binding, but again, it was a heavy bugger, much heavier than I would have expected for mahogany. The other mahogany-bodied guitars I've owned (although typically chambered) were featherlight compared to my former PRS. Who knows? Perhaps it was the added weight from the multiple layers of epoxy clear coat they used - God knows that stuff isn't light.

    Also, I should add that the neck on my CU-24 was notably deeper in profile than the rather thin-looking neck of the Throwback series shown by Paul Reed Smith himself on YouTube. In fact, that Throwback neck appears to be almost like a '62 Fender Strat or Tele (of which I own both) - way, way thin! Tends to cramp the hand something fierce after an hour or so.
    Last edited by Troubadour; 03-15-2013 at 10:35 PM.

  3. #23
    Happy Egads's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Boulder, CO
    Posts
    1,812
    Mahogany guitars CAN be heavy--go play a 70s LP! It does sound like you had a CU24.

    Yes, PRS sells some of their pickups (and does installs) through their PTC (check the site for more info on the PTC, or check the forum posts for some of their truly amazing work).

    There is a Throwback at the GC here in Denver. I played it for a few minutes earlier this week. Awesome guitar.

    If you can, go check out a modern CU, a 408, or a P22. I agree with an earlier comment that PRS is continuing to get better and better.

  4. #24
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Egads View Post
    Mahogany guitars CAN be heavy--go play a 70s LP! It does sound like you had a CU24.

    Yes, PRS sells some of their pickups (and does installs) through their PTC (check the site for more info on the PTC, or check the forum posts for some of their truly amazing work).

    There is a Throwback at the GC here in Denver. I played it for a few minutes earlier this week. Awesome guitar.

    If you can, go check out a modern CU, a 408, or a P22. I agree with an earlier comment that PRS is continuing to get better and better.
    Thanks for your comment.

    I think you may have misunderstood me - I have no doubt that it was in fact a CU-24, and yes, I realize that certain cuts of mahogany can indeed get quite heavy - I've owned a couple of 10+ pound R9s in the past, but they're rare in my experience. Anyway, it sounds like that particular combination (i.e., mahogany CU-24) was in-fact what I happened to have at that time. Now the question becomes . . . how to replace it. Obviously, the pickups are going to be the key, and I honestly don't know where to begin. I'd prefer to stay with the 24-fret/25" scale format, and that doesn't leave a lot of choices. I think the most logical place to start is the current-day CU-24 itself, but I loathe blade switches. I know, I know, it seems silly, but I do. Does anyone know what year(s) they switched over from the rotary selector to the 5-way on CU-24's? And since it appears that the original HFS/Vintage Bass pickups are no longer going to be available, its hard to know what other model(s) of pickups I should focus on?

  5. #25
    aka McCartyman altoidman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Kensington, MD
    Posts
    59
    Quote Originally Posted by Troubadour View Post
    And since it appears that the original HFS/Vintage Bass pickups are no longer going to be available, its hard to know what other model(s) of pickups I should focus on?
    You should be able to buy what you are looking for:

    http://www.prsaccessories.com/collections/pickups

  6. #26
    Senior Member Dirty Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    State of Confusion (NY)
    Posts
    1,709
    You can buy the HFS/vintage bass combo and PRS is offering them again in current production runs.
    -Bob

  7. #27
    Occasionally Onery Member CantankerousCarl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    769
    Troubadour - just to share with you my comparable tale, I had a 1992 Custom 24 trem with moons and gold hardware. Sold it for a song stupidly in the early 2000s, had stopped playing and was poor. When I started playing again about a year and a half ago, I knew I HAD to get that PRS sound and feeling back.

    Not having a huge budget, and doing a lot of research, and internet searching, and I ended up with a 1993 Standard 24 - same construction as my lost love except she's all mahogany, no maple top.

    As soon as I plugged her in, I was back. It's the wide-thin neck and single coil tones that defined the essential PRS for me.

    Since then, I have purchased 3 bolt-on CE 24s from the early 90s, as well as a 2011 Throwback Custom 24. While my HFS/VB 90s PRSes have their differences, they are similar enough in tone and feel that they all "get me there."

    The Throwback sounds amazing, but with the 59/09s it doesn't sound "vintage PRS" to me. To my ears, the newer PRS pickups have more complexity and smoothness, but the single-coil tones just don't have the same crispness and bite as the older ones.

    That being said, I have no interest in swapping the 59/09s in the TH with the T&Bs because it sounds great and different the way it is, with some of the most interesting harmonics I have ever heard when overdriven.

    If you value the same attributes I do, then you owe it to yourself to locate an early 90s CU24 from a reputable shop that will let you return the guitar if you're not happy. There are some older pieces out there, even at some of the major chains.

    Hope you find what you're looking for, and enjoy the journey getting there.
    1990 CE24 MT | 1991 CU24 | 1991 CE24 | 1992 CE24 MT
    1993 STD 24 | 1997 CE24 3pc MT | 2008 SE Semi-Hollow Soapbar
    2011 SE Akesson | 2011 CU24 GC Throwback | 2012 Signature Limited
    2013 408 Brazilian | 2013 Paul's Guitar | 2013 S2 Mira | 2013 Hollowbody II
    2013 CU24 Swamp Ash Limited | 2014 SE Zach Myers

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Troubadour View Post
    Who knows? Perhaps it was the added weight from the multiple layers of epoxy clear coat they used - God knows that stuff isn't light.
    They used polyurethane clear coat, I believe; poly is different stuff from epoxy finishes. You wouldn't use epoxy on a guitar, it's meant for heavy industrial items and car underbody parts.
    If something is too hard to do, then it's not worth doing. You just stick that guitar in the closet next to your short-wave radio, your karate outfit and your unicycle and we'll go inside and watch TV.
    -- Homer J. Simpson

  9. #29
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by altoidman View Post
    You should be able to buy what you are looking for:

    http://www.prsaccessories.com/collections/pickups
    Excellent! Thanks for the heads-up and the link, Altoidman. I guess I misunderstood someone earlier - I thought they were no longer available, but that's great news.

  10. #30
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by DirtyMoonsRJT View Post
    You can buy the HFS/vintage bass combo and PRS is offering them again in current production runs.
    And thanks to you too, Bob. Glad to hear that they're still available. In contrast to my earlier thoughts, it sounds like there is indeed plenty of hope for me in the future.

  11. #31
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by LSchefman View Post
    They used polyurethane clear coat, I believe; poly is different stuff from epoxy finishes. You wouldn't use epoxy on a guitar, it's meant for heavy industrial items and car underbody parts.
    Right you are, LS! A slip of the tongue. They're both polymers, and both resins, as is polyester resin which has become far more common for guitars in recent years than polyurethane (ala John Suhr and others), but polyurethane is not an "epoxy" resin.

  12. #32
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by CantankerousCarl View Post
    Troubadour - just to share with you my comparable tale . . .
    Carl,

    Thanks for taking the time to share your tale with me and the others, and you're right, it truly is a similar set of circumstances to mine, but I'm glad things have worked out for you. I suspect they'll work out for me too in the end. In fact, some of what I've learned here just today in this thread has given me an all new level encouragement. I think I simply need to spend more time researching and playing a wider range of PRS guitars, particularly the CU-24 and perhaps even the Throwback (if I can find one anywhere?), until I can narrow down the subtle differences between them, and get to a personal comfort zone. I suspect that's going to be the newer or older HFS/VB-equipped guitars.

    My chief concern with purchasing an older CU-24 is making sure that it hasn't been modified in any serious way (which tends to be rare these days), and my concern with buying a newer one of some sort, is whether or not the other electronics (i.e., components other than the pickups, wiring scheme, etc), will be directly comparable to my earlier CU-24. I've built, restored and messed around with enough guitars over the years to know that very slight or simple changes in things like wiring pattern, switches, pots and tone caps can have a major influence on the overall sound palette. And here again, that makes a remote sale (ala E-Bay, etc.) a dicey proposition. Anyway, thanks again for your post and best of luck to you.

  13. #33
    Senior Member sergiodeblanc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Downers Grove Il.
    Posts
    5,165
    Can't wait to see your new (old model) Custom 24, have fun shopping!

  14. #34
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by sergiodeblanc View Post
    Can't wait to see your new (old model) Custom 24, have fun shopping!
    Thanks Sergio, and thanks also for your meaningful contributions to this thread. Its helped me to begin learning some of what I needed to learn. I don't honestly know which way I'll end up going. If I could (i.e., if it were possible), I'd order-up a special order CU-24 without the blade switch, and ask them to install a set of HFS/VB pups with rotary selector, sweet switch and single volume, but I suspect that's not too likely from their current offerings. Only time will tell. I've just gotta get busy researching things a bit.

  15. #35
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    19
    Hello again guys,

    I took a moment to re-read this entire thread here this morning, and unless I'm mistaken, it sounds like it might be entirely possible for me to custom order a CU-24 directly from PRS with features that would be almost exactly like those on the one I sold. I don't know if this was just a momentary epiphany on my part or whether this was the message that others here were trying to convey to me all along yesterday, but it certainly sounds like is possible. The key is going to be the blade switch. If I can special order a new CU-24 in virtually any color combination including gloss black back and sides, and with single volume/single tone controls, but with HFS/VB pickups and a rotary selector instead of blade switch, then as I see it, I'm about 99.9% of the way there, right? The older 'sweet switch' that I had certainly isn't a deal-breaker for me, so I don't see why that special order CU-24 wouldn't be extremely close to the one I foolishly sold back in 2001/2002. Have I missed anything?

    The only concerns that I would have with such a special order are the newer (current production) HFS/VB pickups (and other electronic components), and the wiring scheme. I spent a fair bit of time looking over the PRS website last night, and its got a boatload of great information that I really didn't know was there, but I still wasn't able to determine the following:

    a) Whether you can special order a CU-24 with rotary selector rather than blade switch?

    b) Whether current-day (2013) HFS/VB pickups are exactly the same as the original HFS/VB pickups of circa '90/'91, or whether they're reissues of some sort?

    c) Whether the current-day wiring pattern would be exactly the same as the original pattern used in '90/'91? And lastly . . .

    d) Whether the other electronic components used in the current-day build (e.g., pots, caps, wire, etc) would be roughly the same or better materials as those used back in '90/'91?

    Does anyone have any views on this?

    Thanks for continued assistance.

  16. #36
    Senior Member sergiodeblanc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Downers Grove Il.
    Posts
    5,165
    a) You can buy a Navarro and have the PTC install a rotary switch.

    b) I don't recall the HFS/VB ever going out of production, so they should be the same.

    c) Maybe, I'm not sure if yours had Power-out-of-phase, if not then yes.

    d) Totally.

  17. #37
    Senior Member Jazzedout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Greece
    Posts
    215
    I believe in this market you can find a lot of all original and in great condition CU24 with HFS and rotary switch, at a great price.
    1992 PRS Cu24 Tortoise Shell, "10",Birds, Reg Neck
    2005 PRS 513 Brazilian Rosewood Orange

  18. #38
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by sergiodeblanc View Post
    a) You can buy a Navarro and have the PTC install a rotary switch.

    b) I don't recall the HFS/VB ever going out of production, so they should be the same.

    c) Maybe, I'm not sure if yours had Power-out-of-phase, if not then yes.

    d) Totally.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Many thanx, Serg!

    a) No brainer! In fact, I could install the rotary switch here myself, and as you've said, the Navarro is indeed very close to a CU-24 in almost all respects, but alas, its available only white. Not good!

    c) I'm not sure either

  19. #39
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzedout View Post
    I believe in this market you can find a lot of all original and in great condition CU24 with HFS and rotary switch, at a great price.
    Thanx, Jazzed-out!

    To be perfectly honest, I haven't started looking particularly hard as yet, but I will be, in the weeks and months ahead, especially if a new (custom order) CU-24 cannot be ordered with rotary selector. So if what you say is true, its great news!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •