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Thread: What stomp box's with your PRS?

  1. #41
    Geezer wilerty's Avatar
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    All I use is a Strymon El Capistan delay and a Boss RV5 for light hall reverb ... although I may try a Strymon Flint reverb/vibrato soon.
    Bill

    PRS Private Stock #3568
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  2. #42
    DGT Club Vice President
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    In my opinion, the OD-3 is a full and rich sounding drive. It rounds out the neck pickup with a sonic bloom that's almost juicy...all that crap said, to me it gets me in thick humbucker country as well as SRV/Pearl Jam style Strat tones. It's a robust sounding pedal that can dial up more drive than a TS pedal, but doesn't get overly aggressive.
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  3. #43
    Senior Member jfb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wilerty View Post
    All I use is a Strymon El Capistan delay and a Boss RV5 for light hall reverb ... although I may try a Strymon Flint reverb/vibrato soon.
    El Capistan is great. The Flint will not let you down. It is extremely warm and rich to my ears.
    Plank Owner

  4. #44
    ToneConsoleOfDoomOwner Sekunda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jfb View Post
    El Capistan is great. The Flint will not let you down. It is extremely warm and rich to my ears.
    I use the El Cap and the Flint... LOVE them both! They are very clean with my HX/DA and the Stripped 58. Awesome vintage sounds...
    ~ Matt

    Quote Originally Posted by LSchefman View Post
    Son, the HX/DA is a man's amp. One channel, not two, 50 watts of red hot glass crankin' out a tone that's big as...well...it's big.

  5. #45
    SuperD Boogie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wilerty View Post
    All I use is a Strymon El Capistan delay and a Boss RV5 for light hall reverb ... although I may try a Strymon Flint reverb/vibrato soon.
    Bill, if I were only playing my music, then I'd live with the El Capistan, Flint and an EP Booster out front, only. The Strymon spacial effects are arguably the best ones on the market today.

  6. #46
    Senior Member sergiodeblanc's Avatar
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    I really like my Boss GT.... oh never mind.

  7. #47
    Senior Member Chris528's Avatar
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    I just recently got rid of all my individual pedals (all Electro Harmonix except Vox Wah) and purchased a Digitech RP1000. Still tinkering with it, but really happy with it so far.
    "BADASS MODDED" SE SEMI-HOLLOW W/BIGSBY, SE ZACH MYERS, SE TREMONTI, RANDALL DIAVLO RD20, RANDALL DIAVLO RD1, BLACKSTAR HTR1

  8. #48
    Junior Member Boogeyman's Avatar
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    I purchased my first one off of ebay last night... TC Polytune. I didn't get the mini, I got the one with the bigger screen for my old eyes LOL. Pretty stoked about it, it sounds like a hell of a tuner from what i've read.

  9. #49
    Junior Member Victek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris528 View Post
    I just recently got rid of all my individual pedals (all Electro Harmonix except Vox Wah) and purchased a Digitech RP1000. Still tinkering with it, but really happy with it so far.
    I've got the Digitech RP355 which I believe has the same FX chip. It offers a great selection of tones/FX. The main issue I have with the RP355 is the difficulty of accessing the presets with only three foot switches. To use it for live performance I think I would have to limit it to one lead tone/FX and bypass since it's a mess to try to switch and find other presets in real time. The ten switches on the RP1000 should help a lot with that, assuming you can assign presets to the switches and treat them as discreet stomp boxes. The USB interface works well for multi-track recording. I downloaded the X-Edit program, but haven't quite figured out how to create and store my own presets yet. How's the 1000 working out for you?
    Last edited by Victek; 04-05-2013 at 08:51 AM.
    So many guitars So little money

  10. #50
    PRS Addiction CoreyT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boogeyman View Post
    I purchased my first one off of ebay last night... TC Polytune. I didn't get the mini, I got the one with the bigger screen for my old eyes LOL. Pretty stoked about it, it sounds like a hell of a tuner from what i've read.
    I like it mucho better than the expensive strobe tuner I have on my board.
    The poly one is nice since you can strum all strings at once.

  11. #51
    Junior Member Chuckblues's Avatar
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    Red face

    Quote Originally Posted by Victek View Post
    I'm not familiar with the TC pedals, but I have a Digitech Bad Monkey tube overdrive pedal that works nicely with my SE. Silly name not withstanding it has solid construction and separate controls for high and low tone, gain and level. It's also surprisingly affordable. Checkout the reviews on Youtube.
    I just got one Very Happy with it

  12. #52
    Classic Rocker prsrocker1988's Avatar
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  13. #53
    Senior Member cosmic_ape's Avatar
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    Not the latest version of my pedalboard, but pretty close:


  14. #54
    Geezer wilerty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jfb View Post
    El Capistan is great. The Flint will not let you down. It is extremely warm and rich to my ears.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sekunda View Post
    I use the El Cap and the Flint... LOVE them both! They are very clean with my HX/DA and the Stripped 58. Awesome vintage sounds...
    Quote Originally Posted by Boogie View Post
    Bill, if I were only playing my music, then I'd live with the El Capistan, Flint and an EP Booster out front, only. The Strymon spacial effects are arguably the best ones on the market today.
    Allright, allright .... I ordered a Flint ...
    Last edited by wilerty; 04-09-2013 at 04:32 PM.
    Bill

    PRS Private Stock #3568
    PRS Swamp Ash Special
    Mesa Mark V combo
    Fishman Loudbox Artist

  15. #55
    Here's another vote for the Xotic EP Booster. I love that thing, especially after my Boss Blues Driver with the gain dimed.

    As far as brands go, I love MXR. I've got a Carbon Copy, Phase 90, Micro Flanger, Analog Chorus and Badass '78 Distortion on my board and love what each of them do for my sound...
    2013 Wood Library DGT Armando's Amethyst - "Marie"
    2012 SE Angelus Standard - "Calvin"

  16. #56
    Junior Member Chuckblues's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victek View Post
    I'm not familiar with the TC pedals, but I have a Digitech Bad Monkey tube overdrive pedal that works nicely with my SE. Silly name not withstanding it has solid construction and separate controls for high and low tone, gain and level. It's also surprisingly affordable. Checkout the reviews on Youtube.
    I also recently got one .I'm very happy with it .You really can thicken the sound with the tone controls !

  17. #57
    Senior Member aduayer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prsrocker1988 View Post
    man, you got some of my favorites on this one. Bonamassa Wha, RC Booster, Phase 90, Flashback, Carbon Copy, EP Booster, OCD and Box of Rock. congratsz

  18. #58
    Noise IMHO is the main bugaboo of pedals, and it will kill your sound.

    One thing I'd like to discuss about pedals is powering them, because that can be pretty important, not just in terms of convenience but how the rig sounds, especially if you have an amp that doesn't make a lot of extraneous noise -- for example, the PRS HX/DA I play through is dead quiet even with the gain up until I hit a note. Two-Rocks and some other amps of note are also very quiet in terms of hum and noise.

    After many years in the studio, I'm a stickler for eliminating hum and noise, because I am certain that audio signal coming out of a quiet background sounds crisper, more dynamic, and just plain better than signal coming out of a hashy or noisy background.

    This means that the noise that often comes from a pedal board can interfere with the integrity of a player's tone.

    Unfortunately it's very easy to get hums and buzzes when pedals are wired up, and if you have ground loop city on your pedalboard, even the best cables are going to let you hear all that hum and noise clear as day. And some pedals are susceptible to noise from nearby wall warts, etc., though IMHO the ones that are really well designed are far less likely to react to stray EMI/RFI.

    I've done a lot of experimenting, found that the easiest solution to this problem is to use a high quality, fully-isolated, well-shielded power supply, like the ones made by Voodoo Labs (and a few others, but caveat emptor, there are power supplies on the market that simply suck).

    It's also important to use the power supply as the designers intended, that is, only one pedal per isolated outlet. In the case of a paired outlet (for example, you often see a pair of 9V and 12V outlets meant to be either/or, but not both), yeah you can sometimes run a pedal into each one, but you then lose the benefit of the isolation, and you get noise, as I will explain below. I have found that even the Boss TU2 and TU3 with the extra outlet will cause noise if you create a daisy-chain using other pedals, because the extra outlet is not isolated. Yeah, it's convenient as an emergency thing, but not the way to go if you have a lot of stuff on your board.

    As an experiment over the weekend, I tried a variety of pedals using the extra Boss TU3 power outlet, and using the extra outlet of a paired set of outlets on my Voodoo Labs power supply, just to see what would happen. In both cases I was careful to make sure that the power draw of the attached pedals did not exceed the available power.

    And in all cases, my board went from absolutely dead quiet, to the creation of a very low-level, almost imperceptible hum that I could hear from my amp. Even though the hum wasn't bad, it was audible, and it's that kind of thing that screws with your tone. Worse, when I tried a digital pedal with a tap tempo, and later tried a very well designed analog tremolo pedal, I could hear a slight ticking.

    When I reconnected the pedals as the unit was designed, the hum and the ticking went away. Period. No noise whatsoever.

    I'm convinced that the smart thing to do if you run out of power outlets for your power supply is simply to buy a second power supply and use that instead of trying to create daisy chains, etc., because these days you can buy a small power supply with 5-6 outlets for around $100, such as the Voodoo Labs iso5, and it really does a better job than trying to create daisy chains of various kinds.

    The next issue with some pedals is that certain pedals are not well shielded, and are VERY susceptible to picking up noise from nearby wall warts, or power supplies that are poorly shielded. And this problem is made worse if there are any ground loops, etc, because ground loops tend to act like antennas for noise.

    Manufacturers like TC, Fulltone, etc., shield their products properly, and/or use steel casings that tend to reject RFI/EMI. A Fulltone wah will not pick up noise like some of the other wahs out there (by the way, I've found that the typical cast wah casings don't work as well as steel ones), and I'm sure this is the case with any of the good manufacturers -- but I've had wahs and other pedals by builders that go absolutely bonkers if a wall wart is within 5 feet of the pedal board. So that's something to check for. If you have noise, the first thing to try is move the darn wall warts farther away (and frankly, if I had a pedal that reacted to wall warts badly, I'd get rid of it, but that's just me)!

    Anyway, hope this info helps, as it does make a difference!
    Last edited by LSchefman; 04-09-2013 at 10:56 AM.
    I saw ten thousand talkers whose tongues were all broken...

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  19. #59
    Pincher of Harmonics Blackbird's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LSchefman View Post
    Noise IMHO is the main bugaboo of pedals, and it will kill your sound.

    One thing I'd like to discuss about pedals is powering them, because that can be pretty important, not just in terms of convenience but how the rig sounds, especially if you have an amp that doesn't make a lot of extraneous noise -- for example, the PRS HX/DA I play through is dead quiet even with the gain up until I hit a note. Two-Rocks and some other amps of note are also very quiet in terms of hum and noise.

    After many years in the studio, I'm a stickler for eliminating hum and noise, because I am certain that audio signal coming out of a quiet background sounds crisper, more dynamic, and just plain better than signal coming out of a hashy or noisy background.

    This means that the noise that often comes from a pedal board can interfere with the integrity of a player's tone.

    Unfortunately it's very easy to get hums and buzzes when pedals are wired up, and if you have ground loop city on your pedalboard, even the best cables are going to let you hear all that hum and noise clear as day. And some pedals are susceptible to noise from nearby wall warts, etc., though IMHO the ones that are really well designed are far less likely to react to stray EMI/RFI.

    I've done a lot of experimenting, found that the easiest solution to this problem is to use a high quality, fully-isolated, well-shielded power supply, like the ones made by Voodoo Labs (and a few others, but caveat emptor, there are power supplies on the market that simply suck).

    It's also important to use the power supply as the designers intended, that is, only one pedal per isolated outlet. In the case of a paired outlet (for example, you often see a pair of 9V and 12V outlets meant to be either/or, but not both), yeah you can sometimes run a pedal into each one, but you then lose the benefit of the isolation, and you get noise, as I will explain below. I have found that even the Boss TU2 and TU3 with the extra outlet will cause noise if you create a daisy-chain using other pedals, because the extra outlet is not isolated. Yeah, it's convenient as an emergency thing, but not the way to go if you have a lot of stuff on your board.

    As an experiment over the weekend, I tried a variety of pedals using the extra Boss TU3 power outlet, and using the extra outlet of a paired set of outlets on my Voodoo Labs power supply, just to see what would happen. In both cases I was careful to make sure that the power draw of the attached pedals did not exceed the available power.

    And in all cases, my board went from absolutely dead quiet, to the creation of a very low-level, almost imperceptible hum that I could hear from my amp. Even though the hum wasn't bad, it was audible, and it's that kind of thing that screws with your tone. Worse, when I tried a digital pedal with a tap tempo, and later tried a very well designed analog tremolo pedal, I could hear a slight ticking.

    When I reconnected the pedals as the unit was designed, the hum and the ticking went away. Period. No noise whatsoever.

    I'm convinced that the smart thing to do if you run out of power outlets for your power supply is simply to buy a second power supply and use that instead of trying to create daisy chains, etc., because these days you can buy a small power supply with 5-6 outlets for around $100, such as the Voodoo Labs iso5, and it really does a better job than trying to create daisy chains of various kinds.

    The next issue with some pedals is that certain pedals are not well shielded, and are VERY susceptible to picking up noise from nearby wall warts, or power supplies that are poorly shielded. And this problem is made worse if there are any ground loops, etc, because ground loops tend to act like antennas for noise.

    Manufacturers like TC, Fulltone, etc., shield their products properly, and/or use steel casings that tend to reject RFI/EMI. A Fulltone wah will not pick up noise like some of the other wahs out there (by the way, I've found that the typical cast wah casings don't work as well as steel ones), and I'm sure this is the case with any of the good manufacturers -- but I've had wahs and other pedals by builders that go absolutely bonkers if a wall wart is within 5 feet of the pedal board. So that's something to check for. If you have noise, the first thing to try is move the darn wall warts farther away (and frankly, if I had a pedal that reacted to wall warts badly, I'd get rid of it, but that's just me)!

    Anyway, hope this info helps, as it does make a difference!
    Awesome information, thanks for sharing.
    Not to de-rail, but a related question. What is your experience/opinion of the Furman rack power supplies? They have some that are economically priced, and some that are outrageously expensive. Are any of those units truly isolated in a similar manner to the Voodoo boxes?
    12 408 - 12 DGT - 09 Tremonti II - 98 CU24 - 97 CE22 - Mesa MarkIV - Kemper Profiler Amp - EVH 5150 III - PRS Archon

  20. #60
    Back when I had my studio I used a Furman IT-1220 power balancer. It converted the whole studio to +60/-60. The noise floor dropped significantly.

    The latest version (P-2400 IT) is considerably more expensive but I'm told the problem with the transformer "ringing" has been resolved.

    I loved playing my Roland Fantom X8 and setting my Mackie HR-24's loud enough to feel the sampled Grand Piano. But at that volume there was a districting hiss. Once I installed balanced power, I often forgot the power amp was on. It was dead quiet.
    One Life

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