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Thread: PRS Acoustic Amp? We need one! Let's Design IT!!!

  1. #1
    Senior Member Audie's Avatar
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    PRS Acoustic Amp? We need one! Let's Design IT!!!

    I feel certain these do not exist yet! Imagine how great this could be. A while back Roland set the standard for an acoustic amp with the AC100, then they disappeared. I have one and it is spectacular. Probably the most overlooked acoustic amp. But... it is not a PRS. If PRS could come up with an acoustic amp that would be the cats meow. I would like to see it be 2 channel, 100 watts solid state of course, variable wattage control, standard 25 watts to each tweeter, 50 watts to the woofer, 12 inch speaker with two 3 inch tweeters, reverb, effects loop with send return level control, feedback notch, and phantom power. Avaialble as a combo or head and cab.

    For the eye candy, Do them just as the current tube lineup and an all flamed maple version (no tolex nowhere) with cane grill. Maybe the standard being brown toloex, gold grill cloth (looks tan to me) and a natural flamed maple face plate and flamed maple veneer on the control panel. What y'all think?

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    Senior Member Audie's Avatar
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    No one finds this topic interesting? Come on, then maybe it is the messenger? Just trying to participate in, what is, PRS. I know folks would hype over an acoustic PRS Amp. I cant be wrong can I?

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    I have a Fishman Loudbox 100, which I love, If PRS could improve on that, I would probably be interested. One thing I would like to see, that you did not mention, is: separate effects for each channel. When singing through the Loudbox, I have to put on one of the reverbs on instead of the chorus effect because the channels share the effects. Basically, I find the one that works for voice and use it. It would be nice if I could use the chorus and have reverb on the voice. If chorus is that important, I just turn the effects off in the vocal channel.
    PRS electrics and bass, Taylor BTO GS Cocobolo, K26e Koa, 2012 FLTD 412ce-N and GS mini mahogany acoustic guitars; Bad Cat Cub IIR, Carr Rambler, Fender Supersonic 22, Univox, Fishman Loudbox 100, Loudbox Mini and Mark Bass amps
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  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Audie View Post
    I know folks would hype over an acoustic PRS Amp. I cant be wrong can I?
    Sure you can!

    Think of it this way: An acoustic guitar amp is kind of a weekend warrior thing.

    Touring pros simply use a direct box into the FOH PA for their piezo acoustic guitar sounds, and will use a mic in the studio, or if they want to plug in for some reason, they'll use a direct box there, too. I believe that Paul Smith thinks about the needs of the more pro touring player.

    However, with electric guitars, most touring pros use amps. So PRS makes them.

    Looking at PRS products that have been introduced over the years, there has been a heavy emphasis on truly professional gear, and I can't think of a single thing that was designed to appeal to a broader market. I think that's intentional, and actually pretty smart of PRS.

    The SE line is suitable for, and played by, pro players, too. But it's within the context of PRS' approach, which is an interesting philosophy. They don't want to become Fender or Peavey. That's kinda cool.
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    Quote Originally Posted by LSchefman View Post
    Sure you can!

    Think of it this way: An acoustic guitar amp is kind of a weekend warrior thing.

    Touring pros simply use a direct box into the FOH PA for their piezo acoustic guitar sounds, and will use a mic in the studio, or if they want to plug in for some reason, they'll use a direct box there, too. I believe that Paul Smith thinks about the needs of the more pro touring player.

    However, with electric guitars, most touring pros use amps. So PRS makes them.

    Looking at PRS products that have been introduced over the years, there has been a heavy emphasis on truly professional gear, and I can't think of a single thing that was designed to appeal to a broader market. I think that's intentional, and actually pretty smart of PRS.

    The SE line is suitable for, and played by, pro players, too. But it's within the context of PRS' approach, which is an interesting philosophy. They don't want to become Fender or Peavey. That's kinda cool.
    I never thought of it this way, and have to agree with Les.

    Also, my Fishman sounds like I have a volume control on my guitar, making it louder with out even plugging it into an amp. My bassist agrees with that statement. That would be hard to improve on.
    Last edited by pondsnorkeler; 06-24-2013 at 02:15 AM.
    PRS electrics and bass, Taylor BTO GS Cocobolo, K26e Koa, 2012 FLTD 412ce-N and GS mini mahogany acoustic guitars; Bad Cat Cub IIR, Carr Rambler, Fender Supersonic 22, Univox, Fishman Loudbox 100, Loudbox Mini and Mark Bass amps
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    Senior Member Audie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LSchefman View Post
    Sure you can!

    Think of it this way: An acoustic guitar amp is kind of a weekend warrior thing.

    Touring pros simply use a direct box into the FOH PA for their piezo acoustic guitar sounds, and will use a mic in the studio, or if they want to plug in for some reason, they'll use a direct box there, too. I believe that Paul Smith thinks about the needs of the more pro touring player.

    However, with electric guitars, most touring pros use amps. So PRS makes them.

    Looking at PRS products that have been introduced over the years, there has been a heavy emphasis on truly professional gear, and I can't think of a single thing that was designed to appeal to a broader market. I think that's intentional, and actually pretty smart of PRS.

    The SE line is suitable for, and played by, pro players, too. But it's within the context of PRS' approach, which is an interesting philosophy. They don't want to become Fender or Peavey. That's kinda cool.
    I agree with most of what you say here. But there are non touring pros Les. I am a weekend warrior and like to consider myself a professional. Some venues wont allow for a pa system and you need an amp. I have played a private party (30 folks) in a room of a high dollar restaurant on more than one ocassion. No PA alllowed so as not to bother other customers in the main dining area. I used my 6K Breedlove (early serial number) for this gig with an AER amp. Very professional, professional equipment, and best of all, professional pay. Another example, is that I have, and others I know, sometimes play a jazz brunch with a trio or quartet. Again, the PA was/is not practical. An acoustic amp proved its usefulness again. Unfortunately, the AER is not much to look at and is not a PRS. It took a long time for me to justify my PRS purchase as I do not do much electric guitar playing. But when I do, it will be PRS from here on out. That said, PRS has high dollar acoustics that I would love to give a whirl. I will never be on a touring stage. I have and will use a PA and my DI box when appropriate. If not, a boutique acoustic amp from PRS would be nice, professional and useful to me and many others. I believe a PRS Acoustic Amp is in line with the PRS Standard of Craftsmanship and their customers. It would be a nice addition to the PRS Amp lineup. A PRS acoustic will likely be in my future. The amp for sure, if it were available and it would fall " within the context of PRS' appraoch, which is an interesting philosophy". All said, I guess no one here cares about a PRS Acoustic Amp. Understood, all is good.
    Last edited by Audie; 06-24-2013 at 05:48 PM.

  7. #7
    I meant the big-name touring pro guys. I really think that's who Paul personally wants to appeal to.

    I have no criticism of weekend warriors, and I suspect Paul wouldn't either, but I think PRS kind of wants to appeal to the endorser types. I could be wrong.
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  8. #8
    Senior Member Audie's Avatar
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    An acoustic amp that looks like this would be great. Just needs to be a PRS with the trademark flamed maple . A 1X12, 2X12 or 1X15 cab would top it off. I believe they would sell well for PRS. Not much bigger than a DI box and would address all the needs.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Audie View Post
    That said, PRS has high dollar acoustics that I would love to give a whirl. I will never be on a touring stage. I have and will use a PA and my DI box when appropriate. If not, a boutique acoustic amp from PRS would be nice, professional and useful to me and many others. I believe a PRS Acoustic Amp is in line with the PRS Standard of Craftsmanship and their customers. It would be a nice addition to the PRS Amp lineup. A PRS acoustic will likely be in my future. The amp for sure, if it were available and it would fall " within the context of PRS' appraoch, which is an interesting philosophy". All said, I guess no one here cares about a PRS Acoustic Amp. Understood, all is good.
    I have a PRS acoustic, private stock. I love it. Before that I had a US Tonare Grand acoustic. They are wonderful guitars, and I would guess that you'd love it.

    AER is nice sounding equipment - for some reason I recall seeing one made with a wood cabinet, but I could be wrong.

    In my work, I mic up an acoustic, but I also have onboard electronics; the only thing I'd use the electronics package for would be to run a parallel processed track, say the guitar miked up, but also the electronic output run through a delay or some other effect into a DI box.

    That's just me, of course. And I have yet to record it that way. I wish I liked the way onboard electronics sound on acoustic guitars, but I honestly think the real solution for their audio problems will ultimately be digital modeling and complete reshaping of the signal. And that kind of defeats the purpose of an acoustic guitar; you wind up with something like the Line6 guitars when that happens. Not that that's a bad thing. Just not my thing.

    The PRS amp folks are all about tube amplification for electric guitars. Doug Sewell had his own tube amp company in Texas before joining PRS. I can't imagine them being into designing and building a solid state hi fi amp for acoustic guitars, but you never know.
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    Senior Member Audie's Avatar
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    I here you Les. Acoustic on board electronics are not always the best. When you think about it, it was not long ago Acoustics started coming with electronics. Look at old catalogs from previous to 1996 and you see electronics were simply not there. Oh they were around. but hard to come by. My 6 and 12 string have the best acoustic pickup system I think ever made, the LR Baggs Dual source, which is a piezo under saddle and a mike in the soundbox. I run them into a stereo jack and into a stereo volume pedal. That splits the signal so that the piezo goes to the Roland or the PA and the mike goes to another Roland, Fender Twin or Blues Jr, depending on the tune. The purpose is to give the wall of sound and adjust the signal to each on the fly. Each signal is set up differently to bring out the best of the acoustic tone and the sound of two guitars. Beautiful acoustic harmony! Now I just need a PRS amp or two or three. I am thinking about the 2 Channel H, and Pauls Amp.

    Regarding the AER, yes great equipment. They made a natural Maple wood version with very little flame that was imported from Germany direct when ordered, which made it ridiculously too expensive.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Audie View Post
    Look at old catalogs from previous to 1996 and you see electronics were simply not there.
    I think I had piezo systems on a couple of Ovations I owned in the late 80s/early 90s. Also on a mandolin they made in the US around then.
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  12. #12
    I have a full-size Fender Acoustasonic. It's not that I'm not interested in the discussion - I'm just covered in the acoustic/vocal amp department.

    Now... if you guys wanna help get Doug and the boys in the amp shop to make a reliable (and slightly more powerful) Blue Line SVT and Portaflex B-15 replacement, lemme know!
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    Senior Member sergiodeblanc's Avatar
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    I'm trying to figure out a way to not need an amp for my electrics.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sergiodeblanc View Post
    I'm trying to figure out a way to not need an amp for my electrics.
    two words:

    Tesla coil
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  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by ]-[ @ n $ 0 |v| a T ! View Post
    I have a full-size Fender Acoustasonic. It's not that I'm not interested in the discussion - I'm just covered in the acoustic/vocal amp department.

    Now... if you guys wanna help get Doug and the boys in the amp shop to make a reliable (and slightly more powerful) Blue Line SVT and Portaflex B-15 replacement, lemme know!
    I'm down with that.

    Though my old bass teacher still uses the B-15 he used on Motown sessions in the 70s, so...they're pretty reliable. But there is always room for sonic improvement in amps. Also, they discontinued the Mesa Bass 400+, which was an incredibly good sounding amp (all tube!) and the one Paul McCartney has been using in his studio.

    I wish I still had mine. I'd love a nice PRS bass amp.
    Last edited by LSchefman; 07-01-2013 at 01:47 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Audie View Post
    Look at old catalogs from previous to 1996 and you see electronics were simply not there. Oh they were around. but hard to come by.
    I had a Guild F4, 24 fret acoustic/electric cutaway, mahogany body, spruce top, which I bought new in 1993. I wish I got to hear that through my Fishman. I wasn't aware of acoustic/electric amps back then. I played it through a solid state, 15 watt, 8" speaker Fender. It sounded okay, but not great. I traded it for my Bourgeois in 1999. Sometimes I wish I still had it, it was so easy to play.
    PRS electrics and bass, Taylor BTO GS Cocobolo, K26e Koa, 2012 FLTD 412ce-N and GS mini mahogany acoustic guitars; Bad Cat Cub IIR, Carr Rambler, Fender Supersonic 22, Univox, Fishman Loudbox 100, Loudbox Mini and Mark Bass amps
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    Bobble Head Moderator JMintzer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LSchefman View Post
    AER is nice sounding equipment - for some reason I recall seeing one made with a wood cabinet, but I could be wrong.
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    Junior Member pickwithaustin's Avatar
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    I have the Roland AC series amp also and it's great.

    Paul himself was in town a few weeks ago and he demo'ed a PRS amp. I want one! BUT... I am looking for something for acoustic. I play electric's too, but I have some nice tube half stacks and can't justify something unless it's for my acoustic as well.

    Of the current PRS amps... is there any that stands out as being exceptional with a clean channel for acoustic? (tube only, BTW)

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    Junior Member pickwithaustin's Avatar
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    BTW, Bose makes a pretty nice set up for acoustic.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pickwithaustin View Post
    I have the Roland AC series amp also and it's great.

    Paul himself was in town a few weeks ago and he demo'ed a PRS amp. I want one! BUT... I am looking for something for acoustic. I play electric's too, but I have some nice tube half stacks and can't justify something unless it's for my acoustic as well.

    Of the current PRS amps... is there any that stands out as being exceptional with a clean channel for acoustic? (tube only, BTW)

    Although it may sound okay, acoustic electric amps and electric guitar amps are eq'ed differently. You'd be better off with a specific acoustic electric amp, unless you do another set up as mentioned above, PA, DI, etc.
    PRS electrics and bass, Taylor BTO GS Cocobolo, K26e Koa, 2012 FLTD 412ce-N and GS mini mahogany acoustic guitars; Bad Cat Cub IIR, Carr Rambler, Fender Supersonic 22, Univox, Fishman Loudbox 100, Loudbox Mini and Mark Bass amps
    In music, one must think with his heart and feel with his brain.
    I was joeprs on BAM

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