Page 5 of 8 FirstFirst ... 34567 ... LastLast
Results 81 to 100 of 152

Thread: Introducing the New S2 Series - Made In Maryland - Starting at $1,179

  1. #81
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    10
    While I think it's awesome to add American jobs, all I really see these as are American Built SE's. Nothing to rant or rave about.

  2. #82
    deus ex machina
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    383
    Quote Originally Posted by DaveyD View Post
    While I think it's awesome to add American jobs, all I really see these as are American Built SE's. Nothing to rant or rave about.
    How about the fact that the S2s are "real deal" PRS guitars that are actually built by PRS? The factory that builds the SEs is not owned by PRS. World Musical Instruments is an Asian contract manufacturer that builds value-oriented guitars that are sold under several brand names.

    What's truly significant about the S2s is that PRS has never been able to hit this price point with a "real deal" Maryland-made PRS guitar. The original CE24 (a.k.a. the PRS Electric) was PRS Guitars' first attempt at manufacturing and marketing a more budget-friendly guitar. The original CEs were built very cheaply compared to the Standard 24 and the Custom 24. Yet, they sold for $899.00 "street" in 1988 dollars, which is over $1,700.00 in 2013 dollars.

  3. #83
    PRS Addiction CoreyT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Auburn, WA. USA
    Posts
    2,078
    I applaud PRS's move on this new new line of guitars.
    I have read here and elsewhere negativity on this move, but I think it is a good move.
    It gets more Maryland factory built PRS guitars into hands of some who may not want to drop the coin on a higher priced one.

    And as Em7 said, the SEs built in South Korea are not built by PRS employees.
    They build guitars there for many other brands.
    Very good quality for sure as I own several SEs, but the quality on the new S2s is the same as the core line (same employees), just with less options.

  4. #84
    Junior Member dprather's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    88
    Quote Originally Posted by CoreyT View Post
    I applaud PRS's move on this new new line of guitars.
    I have read here and elsewhere negativity on this move, but I think it is a good move.
    It gets more Maryland factory built PRS guitars into hands of some who may not want to drop the coin on a higher priced one.
    I can agree with you, but I would change it to include those who *can't* drop the coin (yet) on a Core Line PRS. When I was doing music studies in college and still wanting to gig non-stop, there wasn't PRS quality available at a price anywhere near what I could spend, though I wish that there had been!

    I still feel like the SE's are a great value, and more than hold their own against other brands in comparable price ranges, but for some reason it seems like many guitarists that can't afford (or don't want) a Core PRS consider the SE line 'too cheap' to consider. The S2 line could appeal to those players, I hope.

    I remember PRSh saying something along the lines of 'everyone should buy the guitar that is right for them, and it might not be one of mine, but I just ask that you *try* the guitar and give it a chance.' I'm hoping the S2 line will lead to more people trying the guitars that otherwise might not, I'm wanting to try these for myself to be honest.

  5. #85
    A♥ hoards guitars A♥ rugerpc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    deep in the raspberry...
    Posts
    2,914
    What I see here is a company responding to the wants and needs of the market. There have been posts on this forum like that is a bad thing. One even suggested that PRS should be ashamed to label the SE and S2 lines as PRS guitars, that they are somehow not worthy. I'm not sure if those people hate all successful businesses or just PRS in particular, but to dismiss a company for offering more options in more price ranges is foolish.

    I know that Paul would be happy to sell a collector an expensive Private Stock, and it happens all the time. But I know that in his heart, he wants that instrument to be played - a lot - and not just kept untouched under glass. Paul wants a successful company, yes, but just as much he wants people playing his instruments. Offering different price points is the smart thing to do and benefits more players.

    The S2 line has only 3 guitars in it at the moment. Anyone here really think that is the end of the line? (I smell an S2 bass and an S2 acoustic..... hey, a guy can hope, can't he?)
    Thbbbbbt...
    Check it out: Phillybri used to have a band: Resonance But he's soooo over them now!

    Ħsɹǝqɯǝɯ uɐıןɐɹʇsnɐ oןןǝɥ

  6. #86
    deus ex machina
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    383
    Quote Originally Posted by CoreyT View Post
    Very good quality for sure as I own several SEs, but the quality on the new S2s is the same as the core line (same employees), just with less options.
    What's rapidly becoming apparent is that the S2 build process is the result of applying industrial engineering to the core line build process, resulting in a much more efficient and systematic build process. The S2 guitars are designed to reduce waste, maximize throughput, and minimize the occurrence of OS (Oh Poop!) moments. For example, the machine heads (a.k.a. tuners) are basically Phase II locking machine heads with an anti-rotation pin instead of a screw. This arrangement makes it easier to install and align the machine heads. Separating the fingerboard from the neck allows both parts to be worked on in parallel, reducing build time and shortening a potential bottleneck on the critical path. It also allows for the use of automation in radiusing the fingerboard. Radiusing the fingerboards on the core line is a labor intensive manual process. I wouldn't be surprised if the S2 build process involves a much greater use of purpose-made jigs and fixtures to perform complex labor-intensive operations that currently require a skilled hand to perform on the core line. I am also willing to bet that the finish used on these instruments is a modern UV cure-based system that is designed for high volume production.

  7. #87
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    33
    While I really, really 100% approve of the concept of this series, I'm really sad to say I don't like the execution. The Starla and MIra are fine, but there is no chance I'm ever going to pay £1,200 ish (the UK price) for the Custom model, when I could get a core PRS like a CE, SC245 or heck even a Custom 24 for less than that pre-owned. Considering that this is the price point the CE's used to retail at, the Custom is really underwhelming, IMO. The Mira and Starla are different because they've always been a different style. Doesn't affect me as a fan of PRS or anything but have to say I'm not keen on that Custom model at all.

  8. #88
    Cream Crackered Mikegarveyblues's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Warrington, Nr Liverpool UK
    Posts
    2,160
    I really think this mid priced line-up is a good thing. There was a gap in that market for PRS. You also have / had SE's that where getting close to this price and I think a few probably turned their nose up at paying around a grand for an SE. When I told a couple of people about the limited edition Bernie Marsden they where less than enthusiastic. Not about the guitar itself which they liked but the price. A few hundred more and made in the US and they would have jumped on it.

    I wonder if rather than expensive (relatively) SE models (Limited edition or otherwise) there may be some move to an S2 run?

    I've read some of the more negative comments on a couple of other forums... Very little of it seems valid, especially when you realise that they aren't even in the shops for people to try. I like what I see and hear but I'll wait until I get an opportunity to try one in the flesh. Good move? In this current unstable economic climate I can't help but think it is.
    Modified SE Bernie Marsden, SE Custom 24 2012, Fender Strat
    Laney Lionheart L5T-112, Fender Mustang 1
    Wishing for a Blue Bernie!
    Click here for SE Bernie Marsden demo!
    Lessons, covers, backing tracks, etc...www.youtube.com/mikegarveyblues

  9. #89
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    199
    I'm actually really interested in the Custom model. I have an SE 245 for just a gigging/open mic type guitar and it's wide fat neck is really the only thing I don't like about it. I was looking at the SE Custom and when I found I couldn't get one with a pattern neck, I just stuck with the SE 245 since I got it so cheap. Seeing the S2 Custom has a pattern neck like my core guitars really interests me. I'll likely sell the SE and pick up an S2 to have consistent neck profile, and I'll get coil tapped pups. I'd rather buy something new that I can tweak to my needs, than buy something used that's potentially been someone else's experiment.
    _______________________________
    Michael O.

  10. #90
    Cream Crackered Mikegarveyblues's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Warrington, Nr Liverpool UK
    Posts
    2,160
    Just realised I haven't mentioned the look of the S2 site.

    Fantastic guys! It makes the older part seem like it needs a new lick of paint, but the new one is very fresh and dynamic!
    Modified SE Bernie Marsden, SE Custom 24 2012, Fender Strat
    Laney Lionheart L5T-112, Fender Mustang 1
    Wishing for a Blue Bernie!
    Click here for SE Bernie Marsden demo!
    Lessons, covers, backing tracks, etc...www.youtube.com/mikegarveyblues

  11. #91
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    33
    Should probably add that I'm only really complaining about the Custom from an aesthetic perspective. I just wouldn't pick the flat (OK, bevelled) top over a pre-owned alternative. Still think it's vital that PRS attack this market and I'm sure the guitar plays unbelievably well. But it's the only one of the three that still looks like an SE, to me. But hey, each to their own and all that!

  12. #92
    Senior Member jfb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    O'Fallon, MO
    Posts
    4,830
    I applaud all involved with this. The site and information about the new line I find especially fantastic. I can only imagine the work and ingenuity that resulted in this project getting resolved. Congrats to PRS and the future owners of the new S2's.
    Plank Owner

  13. #93
    I really like the concept of the S2 series guitars, the only real problem I have with them is that I am not particularly enamored with the current options. I suppose in doing something like this PRS has to start some where and I can understand the case for the model options that were chosen. I would love to see the S2 series become successful so that more options can be made available in the future. Personally I'd love to see an all hog S2 DGT model and something in the single cut area with two volume and two tone knobs. I'd break out my wallet pretty quickly for one of those options in the S2 line up.

  14. #94
    Would love to see a Singlecut option too.

    My only reservation with this line is how these guitars are going to feel and look compared to the SE.

    If there isn't much difference I wonder if people will spend the extra for an S2 or will they save harder for a core model, or just stick with the cheaper SE?

  15. #95
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Western Michigan
    Posts
    9
    I could not be happier. Especially since they are using the PR neck carve. Looking forward to trying all three, but definitely wanting to add the Mira to my arsenal.

  16. #96
    NJ Devil DISTORT6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    370
    I love that there's a "natural progression" in PRS land now.

    SE--->S2--->Core

    Very cool, PRS.
    Not like the other kids...

  17. #97
    Almost was a FG22 owner.. WEDGE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Too close to the casinos in CT.........
    Posts
    1,545
    Quote Originally Posted by Firebrand View Post
    I could not be happier. Especially since they are using the PR neck carve.
    Agreed as this is essentiallly the DGT carve which is killer. I keep flipping between which I like best and will end up with in my head and am now leaning towards an all black Mira with birdies loaded up with \m/'s.
    ​Secretary of Crackwood Addiction

  18. #98
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by Em7 View Post
    How about the fact that the S2s are "real deal" PRS guitars that are actually built by PRS? The factory that builds the SEs is not owned by PRS. World Musical Instruments is an Asian contract manufacturer that builds value-oriented guitars that are sold under several brand names.

    What's truly significant about the S2s is that PRS has never been able to hit this price point with a "real deal" Maryland-made PRS guitar. The original CE24 (a.k.a. the PRS Electric) was PRS Guitars' first attempt at manufacturing and marketing a more budget-friendly guitar. The original CEs were built very cheaply compared to the Standard 24 and the Custom 24. Yet, they sold for $899.00 "street" in 1988 dollars, which is over $1,700.00 in 2013 dollars.
    It's just an american made SE, that's it, no more, no less. They offer nothing more than you could reasonably get out of an SE. Just not very exciting are awe inspiring at all.

  19. #99
    deus ex machina
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    383
    Except for one important attribute; namely, the S2s are "real deal" PRS guitars. The SEs are World Musical guitars. That's a huge distinction. Is a Gibson Studio just an American-made Epiphone?

  20. #100
    Quote Originally Posted by DaveyD View Post
    It's just an american made SE, that's it, no more, no less. They offer nothing more than you could reasonably get out of an SE. Just not very exciting are awe inspiring at all.
    Then don't buy one. And the last thing you want to do is actually, you know, play one to find out.
    If something is too hard to do, then it's not worth doing. You just stick that guitar in the closet next to your short-wave radio, your karate outfit and your unicycle and we'll go inside and watch TV.
    -- Homer J. Simpson

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •