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Thread: Paul Reed Smith 7 Strings!

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  1. #1
    Senior Member themike's Avatar
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    Paul Reed Smith 7 Strings!

    So back on BAM some of you may remember our 7-string thread, so I figured why not try to migrate it here with the new faces from other forums!

    The point of this thread is basically to show that there is interest in a production Maryland made 7 string (even just a limited run to test the waters). They come with the stigma that they are for kids trying to play Korn songs, but nowadays that is far from the truth. People like Emil Werstler, Clint Lowery, Mike Mushok and Dave Weiner have been using seven strings as writing tools to create a full sound only available with that low B!

    Over on Sevenstring.Org (a very large guitar community specializing in 6,7,8 and extended range instruments), you will see that hundreds of people are financing guitars through private luthiers (Vik, Damoness, Bernie Rico Jr., Strictly7, Blackmachine etc) to build them 7 strings for $3k-$6k when the fact of the matter is a majority of them would prefer a production PRS 7 over a custom built guitar!

    Lets start it off with Emil Werstler's Whitewash 7!





    Paul Reed Smith 7 - S t r i n g A c t i v i s t | Fueled by P T C

  2. #2
    Senior Member themike's Avatar
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    "Soundcheck at Sunday`s show. This is the 7-string I used on all the Metal Clone X stuff. PRS is making a new 7 string for me right now, a 7 string with PRS quality is gonna be out of this world..." - Marty Friedman
    Paul Reed Smith 7 - S t r i n g A c t i v i s t | Fueled by P T C

  3. #3
    Senior Member jcha008's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by themike View Post


    "Soundcheck at Sunday`s show. This is the 7-string I used on all the Metal Clone X stuff. PRS is making a new 7 string for me right now, a 7 string with PRS quality is gonna be out of this world..." - Marty Friedman
    Freaking awesome. Marty Friedman has been my favorite guitar player since the Megadeth-Rust in Peace days. It was cool when he started playing PRS a few years ago. To see him rocking a PRS 7 should be epic!

  4. #4
    Senior Member sleary's Avatar
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    I haven't matters six strings yet lol

    Would be nice to see a cu24 with a7 string option...

  5. #5
    Would a 7 string satisfy my desire for a baritone? I've been doing some reading across the web, and it seems like the main problem is the scale length. I'm wondering what a 25" low B sounds like compared to a 27.7" low B. I'm looking to play cleaner sounds, think Steve Earle's "Even When I'm Blue", up to the bari-tones found on Grissom's last album. I don't know if the Mushok SE, would make that sound cleanly, or if the shorter scale length on these SE 7 strings would be able to reproduce sounds in that territory?

  6. #6
    Member DRM_777's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jarek anderson View Post
    Would a 7 string satisfy my desire for a baritone? I've been doing some reading across the web, and it seems like the main problem is the scale length. I'm wondering what a 25" low B sounds like compared to a 27.7" low B. I'm looking to play cleaner sounds, think Steve Earle's "Even When I'm Blue", up to the bari-tones found on Grissom's last album. I don't know if the Mushok SE, would make that sound cleanly, or if the shorter scale length on these SE 7 strings would be able to reproduce sounds in that territory?
    If it's a toss up between a 7 String and a Baritone (of which I've owned) I'd go for the 7 String every time these days, simply because in my opinion, the 7 string is more versatile in terms of the regular shapes you play while still having that extended low range. With the Baritone in it's most common B Standard tuning, you are locked into playing all your standard shapes 3 whole steps down.

    Essentially the function of a longer scale length allows the guitarist to string with heavy strings, but tune them down in pitch and still have the right amount of string tension where as on a regular scale length, if you were to put the same strings on, the strings would be all flappy. Of course it works the opposite way too as if you put on lighter string, the higher in pitch you tune them, they will have more tension than if they were tuned to the same pitch on a regular scale length.

    Because a longer scale length guitar will have more tension when tuned to the same pitch as a regular scale length, that string will have more snap to it and that is where you might to see a variable in tone.

    But you really have to take into account the gauge of string you are using in regards to the overall tone.

    Baritones generally use a much lower gauge of string across all 6 strings like 72, 56, 44, 30, 18, 13 and the extended scale length allows them to have a similar tension as if you were playing a regular scale guitar at Standard tuning with a regular set of strings.

    And so because a 7 String Regular would be strung something like 56, 46, 36, 26, 17, 13, 10 the tension and tone of the low B string despite the shorter scale length is actually still going to be comparable to that of the low B on a Baritone with it's extended scale length.

    It's all about balance really.....

    The best advice I can really give is simply to give both a Baritone and 7 String a try and decide for yourself.....
    Laugh, Love, Live, Learn - Devin Townsend

  7. #7
    Pincher of Harmonics Blackbird's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DRM_777 View Post
    If it's a toss up between a 7 String and a Baritone (of which I've owned) I'd go for the 7 String every time these days, simply because in my opinion, the 7 string is more versatile in terms of the regular shapes you play while still having that extended low range. With the Baritone in it's most common B Standard tuning, you are locked into playing all your standard shapes 3 whole steps down.

    Essentially the function of a longer scale length allows the guitarist to string with heavy strings, but tune them down in pitch and still have the right amount of string tension where as on a regular scale length, if you were to put the same strings on, the strings would be all flappy. Of course it works the opposite way too as if you put on lighter string, the higher in pitch you tune them, they will have more tension than if they were tuned to the same pitch on a regular scale length.

    Because a longer scale length guitar will have more tension when tuned to the same pitch as a regular scale length, that string will have more snap to it and that is where you might to see a variable in tone.

    But you really have to take into account the gauge of string you are using in regards to the overall tone.

    Baritones generally use a much lower gauge of string across all 6 strings like 72, 56, 44, 30, 18, 13 and the extended scale length allows them to have a similar tension as if you were playing a regular scale guitar at Standard tuning with a regular set of strings.

    And so because a 7 String Regular would be strung something like 56, 46, 36, 26, 17, 13, 10 the tension and tone of the low B string despite the shorter scale length is actually still going to be comparable to that of the low B on a Baritone with it's extended scale length.

    It's all about balance really.....

    The best advice I can really give is simply to give both a Baritone and 7 String a try and decide for yourself.....
    This relates to something I've been confused about. I've played a lot of songs 2 steps down on a regular six string, of course it's a pain to find the right string tension and balance to keep it in tune. If I went to a baritone and tuned it to the same tuning, wouldn't all of the notes be fretted in the same locations as they were with the regular six string? With a 7 string, I would have to actually change up fingering patterns to acheive the same notes, i.e. physically the riff would be played differently?
    12 408 - 12 DGT - 09 Tremonti II - 98 CU24 - 97 CE22 - Mesa MarkIV - Kemper Profiler Amp - EVH 5150 III - PRS Archon

  8. #8
    Senior Member jfb's Avatar
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    I sold the last of my 7's and 8's last year. I occasionally miss them and wonder about PRS replacements but ultimately I think I am happier with my 6's.

  9. #9
    Junior Member Texas_minor_blues's Avatar
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    PRS 7 String in action
    PRS should have used this for their demo

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