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Thread: Isn't it supposed to be the other way around?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by HANGAR18 View Post
    Maybe the artists you have in mind simply like PRS production models as they come off the line and don't have any special customized preferences to justify their own signature model.
    In my own fantasy world, I tried to think up some specs for my own signature model guitar and didn't come up with anything that hadn't already been done.
    Like my current Custom 24, I wouldn't change a thing if I had the opportunity to do so. I like everything about it.
    Maybe, but there are a couple of SE Artist Models that are the same as SE CU 24 or the SE245, and they claim to play off the shelf production models of their guitars. The only real difference is the paint jobs. i.e. the CU 24 and the Navarro, SE245 and the Mikael Akerfeldt and Federik Akesson. Why do they have artist models? (why did orianthi ever have one really) And why not some one like Dave Weiner, how many other people are playing a Swamp Ash 7 string with maple neck and finger board, or a 7 string 513ish (his doesn't have a middle pick up).

    I get the whole this person is playing a stock prs so why does it matter. I really do. I also know Dave Weiner isn't as well known as some of the other artist on the list, but he is playing some one off PRS's. What about Marcos Curiel, he's been playing PRS for years now. I've been a POD fan since they made it big in the 90's and I can't think of a time he wasn't playing PRS.

    I do understand that there might be small differences in neck shape over between an Artist's Model and a stock, or some other small differences. But to this day I've never heard Al Di Moela play or Cody Kilby (hadn't heard of them until I went on the PRS webpage), or several other artist that have their own models and it seems there are a few people who are more well known that more people would want to see that would be to the benefit for PRS to have a signature model.

    Feel free to disregard part or all of what has been said, this is just my opinion...
    I gave that pitch some vibrato, pitches love vibrato.

  2. #22
    Name Manglin' Putz alantig's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spikedog007 View Post
    I really am starting to wonder if there ever will be another Jimi or Jimmy or even Eddie. Maybe I'm just out of touch as well but I really don't see the music industry allowing guitar heroes much anymore.
    Quote Originally Posted by JRod4928 View Post
    Guitar heroes are limited to being heroes within their own genre, because pop culture doesn't care about musical talent.

    Plus, no one is easily impressed anymore. If they want to see something amazing they just have to type it into youtube and look it up. Or if they want to 'feel' like they're playing amazing guitar just like a 'hero', they can go play rock band. It's de-sensitizing.

    I wish I was alive to live during the 70's and 80's.
    Keep in mind the difference in the media environment as well - Hendrix and Page were back in the old three-network days. Very limited options on TV. Radio was far more adventurous - less corporatized, less restricted in what they played. Van Halen came along just before cable TV took off and really fractured the TV landscape, and radio was still a few years away from being more restricted.

    Ownership restrictions on media outlets were lifted, which led to big conglomerates, tighter playlists, less variety, less new stuff - more tried and true. Hey, our research says you want to hear the same four Lynyrd Skynyrd songs every 25 minutes, followed by one of the same five Springsteen songs.

    I find it doubtful that we'll ever see anyone have that kind of impact again - not impossible, but doubtful. Dimebag may have been the closest, but really, how well is he known outside of guitar circles? Or Zakk Wylde - and Zakk's done a fair number of TV shows and movies as an actor.
    Alan

    "I watched approximately 45 seconds of 'Rock Of Ages'. It was like getting punched in the soul." - Abby Krizner

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by JRod4928 View Post
    Is anyone else concerned that with the changeover to these PAF style pickups that PRS will lose some of it's 'signature tone' that was established with Dragon and HFS/VB pickups? Us PRS fans know better, but I'm afraid the general public (the average guitarist) will percieve these PAF style pickups as an attempt to mimic Gibsons because what PRS provides isn't 'good enough', almost like PRS is issuing an admission of inferiority to Gibson.

    What do you guys think?
    Paul openly admits that his inspirations came from all those 50's guitars, ranging from Fender, Gibson, Gretsches to Martins. The first guitars that he made himself in his college days were actually Gibson copies, so that explains where his inspirations come from. Obviously, his favourites were the double-cut Juniors (how the Santana gets its shape) and LP Specials (thinner than LP body). Even the newer Mira design tips its hats to the SG/DC Junior, and the Starla speaks SG/Gretsch/Rickenbackers. His influences were all over the map.

    I'm guessing, Paul's motive of releasing the 5X/0X series pickups were just him expressing his favourite tones through these vintage-informed pickups. He was basically just taking Seth Lover's design and tweak it to voice out tones that he thinks represents the his personal favourites from specific eras / years (57/58/59/53 etc). He wasn't mimicking Gibson or any other specific brand guitars. He even had Ted McCarty (former president of Gibson) as his mentor. He's merely making guitars that cover lots of ground, tonewise and also appearance-wise. Notice how PRSes seem to blend in well in any genre from jazz to metal, while certain guitar like Jacksons and Kramers definitely won't "look" the part for jazz... He just wants his guitars to be more than one-trick-ponies, covering from soft to heavy, from vintage to modern. And being a guitar maker, and a very versatile one, he has to produce more than just modern pickups like the iconic HFS and Dragons. His main aim was to satisfy players of a wide market, and tastes of players differ greatly. So to say, it's just business techniques.

    He did get an exclusive on the wires used on the 5X/0X pickups from the owner of the old Gibson winder machines. So he seized the chance and introduced the family of vintage pickups. WIth that move, not only did he won over lots of lots of "vintage-minded" players, he did please a lot "new-stuff" players as well. So IMO, his admission to being inspired by old Gibsons are justified. He just took all that "old stuff" and make them "newer". He had struck the balance between innovation and tradition, so I'd give him all my props.

  4. #24
    Senior Member sleary's Avatar
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    If you actually look at some big artists guitar or bass inventory ,you'll most likely spot a prs. I saw Jake Pitts from Black Veil Brides sporting a cu24 last summer at Vans Warp Tour.

    Some people might not have heard about Black Veil Brides but getting really big in the metal core scene.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxtuna26 View Post
    Paul openly admits that his inspirations came from all those 50's guitars, ranging from Fender, Gibson, Gretsches to Martins. The first guitars that he made himself in his college days were actually Gibson copies, so that explains where his inspirations come from. Obviously, his favourites were the double-cut Juniors (how the Santana gets its shape) and LP Specials (thinner than LP body). Even the newer Mira design tips its hats to the SG/DC Junior, and the Starla speaks SG/Gretsch/Rickenbackers. His influences were all over the map.

    I'm guessing, Paul's motive of releasing the 5X/0X series pickups were just him expressing his favourite tones through these vintage-informed pickups. He was basically just taking Seth Lover's design and tweak it to voice out tones that he thinks represents the his personal favourites from specific eras / years (57/58/59/53 etc). He wasn't mimicking Gibson or any other specific brand guitars. He even had Ted McCarty (former president of Gibson) as his mentor. He's merely making guitars that cover lots of ground, tonewise and also appearance-wise. Notice how PRSes seem to blend in well in any genre from jazz to metal, while certain guitar like Jacksons and Kramers definitely won't "look" the part for jazz... He just wants his guitars to be more than one-trick-ponies, covering from soft to heavy, from vintage to modern. And being a guitar maker, and a very versatile one, he has to produce more than just modern pickups like the iconic HFS and Dragons. His main aim was to satisfy players of a wide market, and tastes of players differ greatly. So to say, it's just business techniques.

    He did get an exclusive on the wires used on the 5X/0X pickups from the owner of the old Gibson winder machines. So he seized the chance and introduced the family of vintage pickups. WIth that move, not only did he won over lots of lots of "vintage-minded" players, he did please a lot "new-stuff" players as well. So IMO, his admission to being inspired by old Gibsons are justified. He just took all that "old stuff" and make them "newer". He had struck the balance between innovation and tradition, so I'd give him all my props.

    Good points - I think we're on the same page as far as what Paul was thinking. I just wonder if the vast majority of guitarists will realize this, or if they'll just think this is PRS's attempt to copy the old PAFs, just like other pickup companies have tried for decades.

    As a guitarist who plays hard rock style music a lot, it's a little disappointing that the HFS and Dragons aren't the stock pickups anymore. But I understand that I'm in the minority, and the majority of PRS players will love the new (old) style of pickups. My main concern is that I hope PRS doesn't lose the iconic tone that their iconic pickups helped them establish. But I'll admit, I'm impressed with the hoops he has jumped through in order to re-create the PAF's - he's a visionary and he's committed to satisfying his customers.

    With all of that said - my 2013 Custom 24 with 57/08's is arriving tonight. So I'll finally be able to give my 2 cents from a "new PAF" owner's standpoint .... even if it is only for a few days before I pull them out and install Tremonti's

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by JRod4928 View Post
    Good points - I think we're on the same page as far as what Paul was thinking. I just wonder if the vast majority of guitarists will realize this, or if they'll just think this is PRS's attempt to copy the old PAFs, just like other pickup companies have tried for decades.

    As a guitarist who plays hard rock style music a lot, it's a little disappointing that the HFS and Dragons aren't the stock pickups anymore. But I understand that I'm in the minority, and the majority of PRS players will love the new (old) style of pickups. My main concern is that I hope PRS doesn't lose the iconic tone that their iconic pickups helped them establish. But I'll admit, I'm impressed with the hoops he has jumped through in order to re-create the PAF's - he's a visionary and he's committed to satisfying his customers.

    With all of that said - my 2013 Custom 24 with 57/08's is arriving tonight. So I'll finally be able to give my 2 cents from a "new PAF" owner's standpoint .... even if it is only for a few days before I pull them out and install Tremonti's
    We're both in the modern camp. I've always been a fan of the "90's-00's Rock" or modern metal, so there's a lot of "The PRS/Mesa Tone" kind of stuff in my music. Paul's got the modern part right from the beginning, so he's now focusing more on getting the vintage ones right. He's earning a wider appeal than he ever would in the 90's. But that's not to say he's given up on the modern stuff. There's the \m/ that came out last year, which is by all means a rock/metal pickup, then he's got the 408 as well, which is not exactly vintage-voiced. The HFS/VB, Tremonti, SC 250 and Dragon II are still coming out from the factory so that probably means he's nailed it since the inception and the demand still remains, so I doubt PRS is "converting" their own image into purveyors of vintage tone products....

    That said, how's the 57/08 working out for you?

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxtuna26 View Post
    We're both in the modern camp. I've always been a fan of the "90's-00's Rock" or modern metal, so there's a lot of "The PRS/Mesa Tone" kind of stuff in my music. Paul's got the modern part right from the beginning, so he's now focusing more on getting the vintage ones right. He's earning a wider appeal than he ever would in the 90's. But that's not to say he's given up on the modern stuff. There's the \m/ that came out last year, which is by all means a rock/metal pickup, then he's got the 408 as well, which is not exactly vintage-voiced. The HFS/VB, Tremonti, SC 250 and Dragon II are still coming out from the factory so that probably means he's nailed it since the inception and the demand still remains, so I doubt PRS is "converting" their own image into purveyors of vintage tone products....

    That said, how's the 57/08 working out for you?
    I'll be honest, I've never heard tone from a humbucker like this 57/08. My perception of what a humbucker can do has changed after playing this. I've played and heard many many types of humbuckers in the past, and the things I evaluated were: clarity, responsiveness, 'heaviness', resonance, presence, and overall tone. But after playing the 57/08, I have to add a new one to the list - harmonic overtones.

    Even when playing a simple E chord, the 57/08 oozes with overtones and complexity that can't be truely described, it's making me re-consider installing tremonti's in it. My only complaint is that harmonics don't 'jump' off of the strings and stand out like they do on other pickups, like the tremonti's. But that may be solved using a boost pedal or some other means.

    The true test comes on Saturday. My brother in law has a USA Tremonti, and I can do some A/B/C tests with the Tremonti, the CU24 with 57/08's, and my old CE24 with Dragon I's.
    2013 PRS Custom 24 - Charcoal Burst Quilt - 57/08
    Ibanez SR650 Poplar Burl 4 string bass
    Carvin Cobalt Acoustic
    Douglas 7 String

  8. #28
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    Sounds pretty good. Let's see whether the Tremonti or the 57/08 wins the cage match. You can try a distortion pedal first if you have one, it'll make the harmonics jump right out.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxtuna26 View Post
    Sounds pretty good. Let's see whether the Tremonti or the 57/08 wins the cage match. You can try a distortion pedal first if you have one, it'll make the harmonics jump right out.
    haha we'll see - they're 2 different animals. But now that I've heard the 57/08, the question is, can I live without it... I wish I had a 59/09 to throw into the mix too.

    I want to give an overdrive pedal a shot - all I have right now is a Wylde Overdrive pedal, or one of the OD's built into the VOX Tonelab, I haven't had the chance to experiment much yet but I'm sure that they'd help. I have a feeling I'll end up keeping the 57/08's and start my search for an overdrive.

    Anyway - sorry to threadjack!
    2013 PRS Custom 24 - Charcoal Burst Quilt - 57/08
    Ibanez SR650 Poplar Burl 4 string bass
    Carvin Cobalt Acoustic
    Douglas 7 String

  10. #30
    The only PRS artist I'd heard before getting hooked on the PRS thing was Carlos Santana. The rest I only know from the PRS website. I have to be honest, I wouldn't buy any of those artists music, they aren't my thing. I love the guitars they play though!

  11. #31
    Defender of the Universe HANGAR18's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JRod4928 View Post
    sorry to threadjack!
    No worries.
    MEGADETH - METALLICA - JUDAS PRIEST - IRON MAIDEN - SLAYER - BLACK LABEL SOCIETY - TED NUGENT - AC/DC - TWISTED SISTER - KISS - CHEAP TRICK - ZZ TOP

  12. #32
    Defender of the Universe HANGAR18's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Desperado View Post
    The only PRS artist I'd heard before getting hooked on the PRS thing was Carlos Santana. The rest I only know from the PRS website. I have to be honest, I wouldn't buy any of those artists music, they aren't my thing. I love the guitars they play though!
    If memory serves, I heard of Orianthi here, found more information on her on the Web, saw the video with her and Steve Vai and filed it away in my head. Later, I went to see Iron Maiden and Alice Cooper was one of the opening acts. Sure enough, I see his lead guitarist and I was like, "holy crap! I think I know who that is!" That was kinda neat.
    MEGADETH - METALLICA - JUDAS PRIEST - IRON MAIDEN - SLAYER - BLACK LABEL SOCIETY - TED NUGENT - AC/DC - TWISTED SISTER - KISS - CHEAP TRICK - ZZ TOP

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