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Thread: What don't you like about PRS guitars?

  1. #21
    I can't think of anything to complain about. I'll have to let you know another time.

    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisCst22 View Post
    I'd love to see PRS switch to this type of output jack. They might be harder to replace but they sure seem durable and of higher quality.



    I can't really think of anything else I would change.
    Actually, the Switchcraft jacks on the PRS are of equal, if not better, quality. Plastic jacks like that are prone to failure on an instrument that gets plugged into regularly, and servicing is much easier with the PRS jacks as you state.

    PS - this info comes from my studio tech.
    Last edited by LSchefman; 01-27-2014 at 01:23 PM.
    If something is too hard to do, then it's not worth doing. You just stick that guitar in the closet next to your short-wave radio, your karate outfit and your unicycle and we'll go inside and watch TV.
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  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by LSchefman View Post
    I can't think of anything to complain about. I'll have to let you know another time.



    Actually, the Switchcraft jacks on the PRS are of equal, if not better, quality. Plastic jacks like that are prone to failure on an instrument that gets plugged into regularly, and servicing is much easier with the PRS jacks as you state.

    PS - this info comes from my studio tech.
    Yeah, I think these switches are for a different application. Those metal bars that go over the top - that's actually a contact that disengages the connection between the right side and the (hidden) connection on the left side. Also, this one is PCB mounted (I don't know if you can get them with eyelets for soldering wires to). It's more of a jack for pedals, rack units, preamps etc. I would also think that the standard switchcraft types are more durable (simpler build). This one is also disconnected from the chassis which would be another reason to use them (for some specific applications).
    Last edited by Michael_DK; 01-27-2014 at 01:45 PM.

  3. #23
    Opaque John Beef's Avatar
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    I dislike that I have drive 2 hours to Tucson to have any sort of selection to gawk over. We Phoenicians deserve better than Guitar Center.
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  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael_DK View Post
    Out of curiosity - what is it that makes a toggle superior to a blade in your opinion(s)?
    For me, toggles are easier to switch quickly on the fly - basically you just need to whack it in one direction or the other, while the blade switches are smaller and seem to be more fragile. A good toggle switch seems to be more heavy-duty.

    I think the toggles are easier to replace, too.

    Note that this preference applies to 3-way blade switches only. There are obvious benefits to a 5-way blade switch (i.e., two more sounds on guitars wired that way) versus a 3-way toggle. And I do prefer the 5-way blade to the rotary.
    PRS/Thorn/Hamer USA ==> ENGL/Bogner/Marshall

  5. #25
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    Not much...

    Only thing that comes to mind is the way the toggle looks on singlecuts that have the switch on the top side. It screams for a poker chip. It's mainly because I'm old enough to have been "programmed" that way, but it always looks "off" to me. It doesn't look off on DC's to me, but that's because it's in the middle of a dimple, and on the bottom side anyway...which sort of serves the aesthetic I guess.

  6. #26
    Senior Member sergiodeblanc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gball View Post
    2. Perhaps not related to some deficiency in the guitars themselves, but the parts are priced astronomically for no apparent reason. Even the "G" company prices its parts as relative bargains in comparison and I just don't understand it. The cost of the US bridge is obscene for a simple piece of CNC'd aluminum, and I don't know what those lampshade knobs are made of but for the absurd price (for a set of only 2 no less!) I sure hope it is something rare and unique.
    Neither one of the parts you mentioned are really all that "simple", but I did feel that way about the lampshades until I realized I can spend $20 on f@cking salad fixings!

    These are proprietary parts.. meaning nobody else makes or uses them besides PRS. Unlike say a Tune-o-matic or Strat trem there are only two places that make these things, and both are made by an American workforce in the good old USA which ain't cheap! "G" and "F" use a variety of sources for their parts and have the added benefit of a 50 year head start on people making replacement parts which has an effect on the market price. Not to mention the tight quality control standards places like MannUSA and Excel have while remaining small businesses.

    We are also talking about a "Luxury Brand" here.. Replacing a stock button on a Burberry jacket will cost a lot more than getting a replacement for the First Down NorthFace knockoff you can buy at Walmart.

    I do agree it sucks to be priced out of a swimming pool full of PRS though... but a pool filled with Schecters just wouldn't have the same appeal.

  7. #27
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    PRS does a great job of listening to it's customers and improving the product from year to year. Huge props to them for that. But I do have one suggestion....

    My hand sticks on the back of the neck. Use some sort of finish/non-finish that doesn't make your hand stick. I'm sure they have to finish it or else the neck would have long term stability issues due to humidity, etc. But that's the only complaint I have.
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    Oh yeah, inspired by John Beef:

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  9. #29
    Plank Spanker justmund's Avatar
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    The (current) AUD vs USD exchange rate

  10. #30
    Occasionally Onery Member CantankerousCarl's Avatar
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    Me, my cantankerous self - I am not 100% sold on the V12 finish yet.

    It seems to mark awful easily, and I have two guitars with V12 that have issues with the finish lifting or separating in spots (neck joint / fret ends). These areas are currently minor - not enough to risk shipping loss / damage to go back to the PTC - but just enough to annoy me because I see them and know they are there.

    However, I love the fact that I know that PRS and the PTC will take care of me no matter what I need.
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  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by sergiodeblanc View Post
    Neither one of the parts you mentioned are really all that "simple", but I did feel that way about the lampshades until I realized I can spend $20 on f@cking salad fixings!

    These are proprietary parts.. meaning nobody else makes or uses them besides PRS. Unlike say a Tune-o-matic or Strat trem there are only two places that make these things, and both are made by an American workforce in the good old USA which ain't cheap! "G" and "F" use a variety of sources for their parts and have the added benefit of a 50 year head start on people making replacement parts which has an effect on the market price. Not to mention the tight quality control standards places like MannUSA and Excel have while remaining small businesses.

    We are also talking about a "Luxury Brand" here.. Replacing a stock button on a Burberry jacket will cost a lot more than getting a replacement for the First Down NorthFace knockoff you can buy at Walmart.

    I do agree it sucks to be priced out of a swimming pool full of PRS though... but a pool filled with Schecters just wouldn't have the same appeal.
    I agree with you completely about PRSs position in the marketplace and the proprietary nature of the products, but just taking the bridge as an example: I was, for a time, involved in procurement at a company that manufactured industrial air compressors. It was a niche company at the top of the industry, even considered a bit of a luxury brand in its own right, so I have a little bit of experience with having proprietary aluminum parts machined in small quantities. While I do understand that the development costs of a part like this must be amortized during the sale of the finished pieces, knowing about what the actual manufacture of the part would cost it shocks me that PRS is charging these prices.

    I don't feel the guitars are at all overpriced, in fact I believe them to be great value for the money, but seeing the cost of some of the parts, including pickups, does shock me a little, especially when you factor in the cost from other small builders (many much smaller than PRS). Check the price of a Schroeder bridge as an example.

  12. #32
    Opaque John Beef's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gball View Post
    Check the price of a Schroeder bridge as an example.
    +1. You can't argue this point. I have not seen his bridges in person but they have the reputation of being every bit as nice as a PRS bridge for 1/2 the price (less than half if we compare apples to apples - adjustable bridges).

    However, Apple is another example of a company that routinely gets away with charging more for the same product as its competitors. The market decides whether the prices are fair or not.
    The Bovine Fury <-- stream and download our album "Eleven by Twelve" for free.
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  13. #33
    Senior Member LJD's Avatar
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    The Pattern neck carve. I was under the impression that the carves are consistent but the carve on my 2012 HBII feels too small, not enough shoulder. I've played a bunch of new models in store and they vary and all had fuller shoulders on Pattern carves. I recently played my fiends C22 with a classic Wide Fat and I was pretty jealous. Sometimes I think they let small handed "Jimmy" cut his teeth shaping the neck on my super expensive AP order. That and the V12 finish... too candied/thick.

  14. #34
    Senior Member sergiodeblanc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gball View Post
    While I do understand that the development costs of a part like this must be amortized during the sale of the finished pieces, knowing about what the actual manufacture of the part would cost it shocks me that PRS is charging these prices.

    I don't feel the guitars are at all overpriced, in fact I believe them to be great value for the money, but seeing the cost of some of the parts, including pickups, does shock me a little, especially when you factor in the cost from other small builders (many much smaller than PRS). Check the price of a Schroeder bridge as an example.

    Word! I get a little confused about that when I look at John Mann's prices on his one-piece trems too.

    I think another factor in the cost of parts and accessories is that PRS uses a separate merchandising/sales company to run the PRS Store which probably adds to the cost... I could be totally wrong there though.

    I shouldn't have tried to defend/debate PRS's view or reasons on the matter as it's none of my business, just trying to think of it from their point of view. You know?

    And to prove I'm not a crazy fanboi I'll say that the new bigger craters for the control knobs don't look as sexy, but I can fix that with a little sandpaper.
    Last edited by sergiodeblanc; 01-27-2014 at 04:41 PM. Reason: I spell like an elephant

  15. #35
    Senior Member LJD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisCst22 View Post
    I'd love to see PRS switch to this type of output jack. They might be harder to replace but they sure seem durable and of higher quality.



    I can't really think of anything else I would change.
    These are used in the HB and Piezo equipped guitars. The lugs on these are for circuit boards (no rings), but I'm sure a good glob of solder would hold a lead fine. They're not too expensive ($1.10 on mammothelectronics.com). There is more casing holding the jack steady, but when I removed mine and installed a standard switchcraft, I could't really feel any difference.

  16. #36
    Name Manglin' Putz alantig's Avatar
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    For me, the toggle vs. 3-way blade comes down to a much shorter travel distance on the toggle - seems far quicker to switch with the toggle rather than the blade. Also, I prefer where the toggles are placed as opposed to the blades being around the knobs.
    Alan

    "I watched approximately 45 seconds of 'Rock Of Ages'. It was like getting punched in the soul." - Abby Krizner

  17. #37
    My only "problem" with PRS's stuff is the availability of product. We got to sit in with Paul at A Sharp music on one day and Guitar Center the next, while going around. He was showing off the new Grainger bass, which my son fell in love with. We waited for release date and it came & went with no stock in any of our local shops. It's now been quite a while and I've still never seen one in a store.

    Not much of a gripe though. I doubt they have the capacity/pockets to stock every store with multiple Graingers right off the bat.
    Richard

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  18. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by alantig View Post
    For me, the toggle vs. 3-way blade comes down to a much shorter travel distance on the toggle - seems far quicker to switch with the toggle rather than the blade. Also, I prefer where the toggles are placed as opposed to the blades being around the knobs.
    I love the toggle switches on my PRSi. Perfect!
    Richard

    I tried setting my password to "penis". It said my password wasn't long enough...

  19. #39
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    Sorry, I meant this type of jack. Like Ibanez Jems and such. I love these things.

  20. #40
    Junior Member P.Lo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Beef View Post
    I dislike that I have drive 2 hours to Tucson to have any sort of selection to gawk over. We Phoenicians deserve better than Guitar Center.
    You should look into Cave Creek Guitars just north of ya......great store ran by an awesome man! IMHO

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